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I have three MySQL InnoDB tables: Debtors Companies Private individuals

Now I would like to find information about a debtor. The following SQL is not working, can anyone help me with writing working SQL?

SELECT
    d.id,
    d.type,
    i.name
FROM
    debtors AS d
IF d.type = 'c' THEN
    INNER JOIN
        companies AS i ON (i.debtor_id = d.id)
ELSE THEN
    INNER JOIN
        private_individuals AS i ON (i.debtor_id = d.id)
WHERE
    d.id = 1

Error:

#1064 - You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'IF d.type = 'c' THEN INNER JOIN companies AS i ON (i.debtor_id = d.i' at line 7

Thanks in advance!

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Have you tried hunting for IF in the MySQL documentation? E.g. find the right syntax for IF? You're trying to do stuff that's not doable in MySQL (possibly on SQL altogether). –  Romain May 7 '12 at 12:51
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is how you would usually accomplish something like that:

SELECT d.id, d.type, COALESCE(c.name, p.name)
FROM debtors d
LEFT JOIN companies c
  ON d.type = 'c' AND c.debtor_id = d.id
LEFT JOIN private_individuals p
  ON d.type = 'p' AND p.debtor_id = d.id
WHERE d.id = 1
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Thank you, this is the solution I've used! –  Ivo van Beek May 7 '12 at 13:05
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You can't use the IF like that!

Here is a possible solution:

SELECT
    d.id,
    d.type,
    COALESCE(i.name, i2.name) as name
FROM
    debtors AS d
    LEFT JOIN companies AS i ON i.debtor_id = d.id and d.type = 'c'
    LEFT JOIN private_individuals AS i2 ON i2.debtor_id = d.id and d.type <> 'c'
WHERE
    d.id = 1

Another might be Dynamic SQL but you should avoid it! :)

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Two usual solutions are a LEFT JOIN just like in your example and a UNION which is bad from performance side. The third option is a subquery. Not pretty, definitely not as fast as a LEFT JOIN but works within an IF. +1 for the proper solution. –  N.B. May 7 '12 at 12:54
    
Thank you, this solution works. –  Ivo van Beek May 7 '12 at 13:04
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