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SELECT  d.sbjnum, d.name, d.scan_no, c.scanner  
FROM data AS d  
INNER JOIN check AS c ON d.sbjnum = c.sbjnum  

Database query failed: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'check AS c ON d.sbjnum = c.sbjnum' at line 3

Do not know what I am doing wrong!

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marked as duplicate by Amal Murali, cryptic ツ, Michael Berkowski, Madara Uchiha, TGMCians May 4 '14 at 18:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

check is a reserved keyword in MySQL. Put it in ticks to escape it:

SELECT  d.sbjnum, d.name, d.scan_no, c.scanner  
FROM data AS d  
INNER JOIN `check` AS c ON d.sbjnum = c.sbjnum  
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AS is used for creating an alias for a field, not for a table. For tables, just don't write that AS :)

SELECT  d.sbjnum, d.name, d.scan_no, c.scanner  
FROM data d  
INNER JOIN check c ON d.sbjnum = c.sbjnum  
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CHECK is a mysql keyword. If u insist on using it, at least put it in backtiks.
And also remove the AS in the FROM part.

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check is a reserved keyword in MySQL.

You can change the alias name

SELECT  d.sbjnum, d.name, d.scan_no, c.scanner  
FROM data AS d  
INNER JOIN check1 AS c ON d.sbjnum = c.sbjnum 

Or Put it in ticks to escape it:

SELECT  d.sbjnum, d.name, d.scan_no, c.scanner  
FROM data AS d  
INNER JOIN `check` AS c ON d.sbjnum = c.sbjnum 
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You may try to add a semicolon (;) at the end of the request.

If still not working, please consider give us the CREATE TABLE command for these 2 tables.

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