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I'm a beginner into Chapter 6 of "How to Think like a Computer Scientist", section on Iteration/While Loops.

In the book, a syntax for 2-dimensional table is as follow:

i=1
while i <= 6:
  print 2*i, '   ', 
  i=i+1 
print

However, doing so results in a syntax error. The terminal gave

File "<stdin>", line 4
    print
        ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

I know that the second print statement is unnecessary and removing it would correct the error; however, a line in the later section of the book explains that the second print statement is intended to create a new line after printing a horizontal table. Hence I believe it could be a typo error. I tried several variations but still could not come to a solution.

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1  
why 5th line has a blank print statement? –  Ashwini Chaudhary May 7 '12 at 13:41
1  
@AshwiniChaudhary: It'll print a blank line. Quick way of writing print '\n', and it won't skip more than one line.. –  Makoto May 7 '12 at 13:41
    
@Makoto It will print a blank line but it is not the same as print '\n' –  jamylak May 7 '12 at 13:42
    
@jamylak: No, not quite. –  Makoto May 7 '12 at 13:43
1  
@Makoto that depends on the python version, in python 3.x it prints out <built-in function print> and in 2.x it's '\n', and I think OP is using 3.x here. –  Ashwini Chaudhary May 7 '12 at 13:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It seems to be a problem with the shell

When executing the snippet you posted as a file, it runs. You seem to run in in a shell (<stdin> hints that), and in the shell, the same snippet does not work for me (python 2.7.2 on Ubuntu) too.

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Okay, I think that solves it! Yes, I was trying to run it from the Command Line. But I don't think the book tried to run it in a .py file, and instead I think it was trying to run on the terminal too. –  Jason HJH. May 8 '12 at 14:55

You do not mention if you have the stuff in a file or if you enter it manually.

In the latter case, your terminal looks like

>>> i=1
>>> while i <= 6:
...   print 2*i, '   ',
...   i=i+1
... print
  File "<stdin>", line 4
    print
        ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

That is, in order to terminate the intended while clause, you have to enter an empty line:

>>> i=1
>>> while i <= 6:
...   print 2*i, '   ',
...   i=i+1
...

And here execution already happens.

Another workaround could be to enter the stuff you wantto execute in an if 1 clause:

>>> i=1
>>> if 1:
...  while i <= 6:
...   print 2*i, '   ',
...   i=i+1
...  print
...
2     4     6     8     10     12
>>>
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why is it, that in order to terminate the while clause, you need an empty line in the shell? why doenst the shell just looks for normal python code, until a blank line is entered? –  keppla May 8 '12 at 16:10

...I think that it's that serial comma at the end of the print statement. As said before, if you're using Python 3, it turns into a function (e.g. print(2*i)).

EDIT: After looking a bit closer, it would be easier to simply remove the extra print. It isn't necessary. If you're printing out a horizontal table, there's nothing wrong with appending a newline character to your initial print statement.

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Yeap, that's exactly what I did. I was seeking clarification though regarding what the book printed intentionally; with the second print statement intended to print a blank line. –  Jason HJH. May 8 '12 at 14:56

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