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My english it's no so good, I'll try my best. I have a @RequestScoped bean with a List attribute. This property is linked to a value of a datatable:

<ice:dataTable value="#{myBean.myList}" ..other stuff.. />

The List is dinamically filled with no problem, and the datatable is displayed with no problems. But if, I navigate to another page, and then go back to the initial page the datatable is still with the data of the initial request. It shouldn't be empty again? If the bean is request scoped it should be destroyed after the request, and I should get and empty datatable as the beggining. So, I think the data is being cached by the browser (I tested in Firefox and Chrome). Then I find a solution in this article. I implemented this Filter from @BalusC example:

package com.itablero.servlets;

import java.io.IOException;
import javax.faces.application.ResourceHandler;
import javax.servlet.*;
import javax.servlet.annotation.WebFilter;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;

@WebFilter(servletNames={"Faces Servlet"}) // Must match <servlet-name> of your FacesServlet.
public class NoCacheFilter implements Filter {

 @Override
 public void doFilter(ServletRequest request, ServletResponse response, FilterChain chain) throws IOException, ServletException {
    HttpServletRequest req = (HttpServletRequest) request;
    HttpServletResponse res = (HttpServletResponse) response;

    if (!req.getRequestURI().startsWith(req.getContextPath() + ResourceHandler.RESOURCE_IDENTIFIER)) { // Skip JSF resources (CSS/JS/Images/etc)
        res.setHeader("Cache-Control", "no-cache, no-store, must-revalidate"); // HTTP 1.1.
        res.setHeader("Pragma", "no-cache"); // HTTP 1.0.
        res.setDateHeader("Expires", 0); // Proxies.
    }

    chain.doFilter(request, response);
 }

// ...

 @Override
 public void destroy() {

 }

 @Override
 public void init(FilterConfig filterConfig) throws ServletException {

 }
}

But is not working. The faces servlet name is correct. The filter is being invoked. Even more strange is that if I open the page in one browser(like Firefox), fill the datatable with a request, then I open another browser (like Chrome) and go to the datatable page...is filled with the data from previous request! And is another browser. I think the bean is behaving like a session o application one. Any ideas?


Update 1:

The class is not static neither its variables. Also, I disable tomcat cache, but still not working.


Update 2:

I think probably found the problem. My backing beans are annotated with @Controller from Spring. I use this annotation because then use @Autowired to bind services. Could be this is creating a singleton and that why is not being created and destroyed with every request??


I think pretty sure the problem is in the mix of Spring and JSF2 annotations. Here is the bean definition.

import javax.faces.bean.ManagedBean;
import javax.faces.bean.RequestScoped;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Controller;

@Controller
@ManagedBean
@RequestScoped
public class MyBean implements Serializable {
  private List list = new LinkedList();

//getters and setters

}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You shouldn't manage a single bean by multiple different bean management frameworks like JSF, CDI and Spring. Choose the one or the other. When managing the bean by for example Spring's @Controller, all bean management related annotations of other frameworks like JSF's @ManagedBean and CDI's @Named are ignored.

I don't do Spring and I have no idea why you're using it instead of the standard Java EE 6 API, but the symptoms and documentation indicates that the scope of such a Spring bean indeed defaults to the application scope. You need to specify the bean scope by Spring @Scope annotation. You would also like to remove the JSF bean management annotations since they have no value anymore anyway and would only confuse the developer/maintainer.

@Controller
@Scope("request")
public class MyBean implements Serializable {
    // ...
}

Alternatively, you can also get rid of Spring @Controller annotation and stick to JSF @ManagedBean. You can use @ManagedProperty instead of @Autowired to inject another @ManagedBean instance, or the Java EE standard @EJB to inject an @Stateless or @Stateful instance.

E.g.

@ManagedBean
@RequestScoped
public class MyBean implements Serializable {

    @EJB
    private SomeService service;

    // ...
}
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1  
Absolutely right. I get rid of @Controller and use @ManagedProperty and SpringBeanFacesELResolver and everything works perfectly. Thanks! –  Fisu May 7 '12 at 20:13

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