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I have a list of buttons with grey background, and when a button is clicked I want to change the button's background color to blue. I have tried jQuery's "addClass" and added a class with a different background, but it doesn't override the elements background (which is set with a default class). I could remove the default class, but I need to keep it because it's used to fire other events.

How can I do this (if it's even possible this way)?

Thanks in advance!

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Care to show your code? –  Spadar Shut May 7 '12 at 13:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use inline css, which will override defaults; or in class you add with jQuery.addClass(), use !important; i.e. .btnCool{background: red !important;}

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I really liked this straightforward solution, thanks a lot! –  holyredbeard May 7 '12 at 17:32

I think the problem is inside your .css file. Try setting a new css rule that includes both classes.

You'll have this:

.class1 { styles }
.class1 .class2 { styles } //more specific, higher priority

Hope it helps!

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$('.btns').click(function(){
   this.css({backgroundColor:'blue'});
});

or

.blue{background-color:blue!important}
$('.btns').click(function(){
   this.addClass('blue');
});
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You probably should add some code examples because this can have many different variations, but here is the answer assuming that most of your code is pretty standard:

CSS styles have an hierarchy which helps them decide which property is to be used.

example:

.button{
   background: blue;
}
.button.clicked{
   background: red;
}

whenever you have a button which is also clicked, the second rule will win the argument since it refers to the element by using 2 classes instead of just one.

very much in the same way if you set a color to an element twice, once using it's class to refer to it, and once using it's id, the rule under the id reference will win, because it has higher precedence

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Try this fiddle

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