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(I asked this question earlier, but had forgotten to mention some constraints. This is for Windows Phone 7.1 (Mango) with Silverlight 4 and C# 4, which lacks System.Threading.Tasks, await and more. I'm asking again in hope for a native solution without 3rd party libs like this.)

I'm wrapping a library for my own use. To get a certain property I need to wait for an event, which fires pretty quick. I'm trying to wrap that into a blocking call.

Basically, I want to turn

void Prepare()
{
    foo = new Foo();
    foo.Initialized += OnFooInit;
    foo.Start();
}
string Bar
{
    return foo.Bar;  // Only available after OnFooInit has been called.
}

Into this

string GetBarWithWait()
{
    foo = new Foo();
    foo.Initialized += OnFooInit;
    foo.Start();
    // Wait for OnFooInit to be called and run, but don't know how
    return foo.Bar;
}

How could this best be accomplished?

share|improve this question
    
You can now download Microsoft.Bcl.Async for Windows Phone 7 - it allows async and await usage as you would expect –  Brendan May 28 '13 at 23:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do something like this:

string GetBarWithWait()
{
    foo = new Foo();

    using (var mutex = new ManualResetEvent(false))
    {
        foo.Initialized += (sender, e) => 
        {
            try
            {
                OnFooInit(sender, e);
            }
            finally
            {
                mutex.Set();
            }
        }

        foo.Start();

        mutex.WaitOne();
    }

    return foo.Bar;
}

But you have to be absolutely certain that Foo will call the Initialized event no matter what happens. Otherwise, you'll block the thread forever. If Foo has some kind of error event handler, subscribe to it to avoid blocking your thread:

string GetBarWithWait()
{
    foo = new Foo();

    using (var mutex = new ManualResetEvent(false))
    {
        foo.Error += (sender, e) => 
        {
            // Whatever you want to do when an error happens
            // Then unblock the thread
            mutex.Set();
        }

        foo.Initialized += (sender, e) => 
        {
            try
            {
                OnFooInit(sender, e);
            }
            finally
            {
                mutex.Set();
            }
        }

        foo.Start();

        mutex.WaitOne();
    }

    return foo.Bar;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That worked great! I'll wait a bit more before marking as answer. –  John-Philip May 7 '12 at 15:04
    
One note, ReSharper says "Access to disposed closure" inside finally { mutex.Set(); }. Is it wrong or..? –  John-Philip May 7 '12 at 15:07
1  
The mutex is disposed when leaving the using block. Therefore, if the Initialized event of Foo is called after leaving the GetBarWithWait method then it will throw an exception. If you know that it won't happen, you can safely ignore this warning. –  KooKiz May 7 '12 at 15:12

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