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I know that making a constructor like this:

foo()=delete;

will make it unnaccesible, but what about:

foo()=default;

? I saw this sometimes, but I dont know whatit means!

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1  
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Steve Townsend May 7 '12 at 15:03
3  
-1: "This question does not show any research effort" –  Ferdinand Beyer May 7 '12 at 15:05
3  
It might be hard to google because default has another meaning (and this new one was only added in C++11). –  Tamás Szelei May 7 '12 at 15:07
2  
I think that this is a good reference case question, regardless of whether much research was done here. Personally, I learned something today. –  Richard J. Ross III May 7 '12 at 15:07
3  
@afishwhoswimsaround: But the user knows it's a C++11 feature since he tagged it as such. It is not useful to ask one question for each new C++ feature, and there are many good resources that explain those in detail. –  Ferdinand Beyer May 7 '12 at 15:10

4 Answers 4

Here's how default is useful. Recall that in order to be POD ("plain old data"), a class type must have a trivial default constructor:

struct this_is_pod
{
     int a;
     double b;
};

struct this_is_not_pod
{
    char c;
    float d;
    this_is_not_pod() { }
};

However, what if we would like to provide a means for initializing the class members in some non-trivial way? Just writing a non-default constructor doesn't work:

struct foo
{
    int m;
    void * p;
    foo(double q, Bar & o) : m(magic(q), p(o.gizmo(m, q)) { }
};

Now foo is not POD, because it lacks a default constructor altogether. Adding our own default constructor, like foo() {}, still doesn't work because now the default constructor isn't trivial. C++11 comes to the rescue with default:

struct foo
{
    int m;
    void * p;
    foo(double q, Bar & o) : m(magic(q), p(o.gizmo(m, q)) { }
    foo() = default; // trivial!
};

static_assert(std::is_pod<foo>::value, "You will never see this message.");
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this doesn't address what exactly a "trivial" constructor actually means, i.e. why =default is different than {} –  OpenLearner May 19 '13 at 13:01
    
@FellowsheeL Because the standard says so. A constructor that's defaulted in its first declaration is user-declared, but not user-defined. –  Kerrek SB May 19 '13 at 13:06

In C++03, if you don't define any constructor, the compiler generates a default constructor for you. If you do define some other constructor, however, the compiler doesn't generate a default constructor (at all).

The =default tells the compiler to generate a default constructor even though you've explicitly defined some other constructor as well. This was added in C++11 -- there was no way to do the same in C++03 (or 98). Any constructor you define explicitly differs at least a little from what the compiler generates by default.

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It tells the compile to guess a default constructor, meanign one with no arguments. This is what the compilers usually do if no "delete" is given. It is introduced in C++11 as well as the delete option.

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Compiler will implicitly generate a default constructor, unless you explicitly defined any constructor yourself.

The foo() = default; simply instructs the compiler to generate the default constructor even if you defined a non-default one. It's mostly the same as foo() {} (but see Kerrek SB's answer).

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I am not sure on whether it is exactly equivalent to foo(){}. There are cases where the two might differ, as for example with struct s { int x; } the default compiler generated (as I understand it) would be constexpr foo() {}, which means that s().x is a constexpr... would have to verify this anyway –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 7 '12 at 15:34
1  
It's not the same as foo() {}. The latter isn't trivial. –  Kerrek SB May 7 '12 at 15:44
    
@KerrekSB It appears you are right, section 12.1.5: "A default constructor is trivial if it is neither user-provided nor...". What's the practical difference? –  Branko Dimitrijevic May 7 '12 at 15:55
    
@BrankoDimitrijevic: see my answer :-) –  Kerrek SB May 7 '12 at 17:27
    
@KerrekSB Oh, I got it! Thanks for the info (+1). –  Branko Dimitrijevic May 7 '12 at 17:43

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