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I have a simple table (with about 8 columns and a LOT of rows) in a SQLite database. There is a single program that runs as a service and performs selects, updates and inserts on the table quite often (approximately every 5 minutes). The selects are used only to determine which rows are to be updated, and they are based on a column that holds boolean values (probably translated to integer internally by SQLite).

There is also a web application that performs selects (always with a GROUP BY clause) whenever a web user wishes to view part of the data.

There are two ways to ask for data through the web application: (a) predefined filters (i.e. the where clause has specific conditions on 3 specific columns) an (b) custom filters (i.e. the user chooses the values for the conditions, but the columns participating in the where clause are the same as in (a)). As mentioned, in both cases there is a GROUP BY operation.

I am wondering whether using a view or a custom function might increase the performance. Currently, a "custom" select may take more than 30 seconds to complete - and that's before any data has been sent back to the user.

EDIT: Using EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN on a "predefined" select statement yields only one row:

0|0|TABLE mytable

Using EXPLAIN on the same query, yields the following:

0|OpenVirtual|1|4|keyinfo(2,-BINARY,BINARY)
1|OpenVirtual|2|3|keyinfo(1,BINARY)
2|MemInt|0|5|
3|MemInt|0|4|
4|Goto|0|27|
5|MemInt|1|5|
6|Return|0|0|
7|IfMemPos|4|9|
8|Return|0|0|
9|AggFinal|0|0|count(0)
10|AggFinal|2|1|sum(1)
11|MemLoad|0|0|
12|MemLoad|1|0|
13|MemLoad|2|0|
14|MakeRecord|3|0|
15|MemLoad|0|0|
16|MemLoad|1|0|
17|Sequence|1|0|
18|Pull|3|0|
19|MakeRecord|4|0|
20|IdxInsert|1|0|
21|Return|0|0|
22|MemNull|1|0|
23|MemNull|3|0|
24|MemNull|0|0|
25|MemNull|2|0|
26|Return|0|0|
27|Gosub|0|22|
28|Goto|0|82|
29|Integer|0|0|
30|OpenRead|0|2|
31|SetNumColumns|0|9|
32|Rewind|0|48|
33|Column|0|8|
34|String8|0|0|123456789
35|Le|356|39|collseq(BINARY)
36|Column|0|3|
37|Integer|180|0|
38|Gt|100|42|collseq(BINARY)
39|Column|0|7|
40|Integer|1|0|
41|Ne|356|47|collseq(BINARY)
42|Column|0|6|
43|Sequence|2|0|
44|Column|0|3|
45|MakeRecord|3|0|
46|IdxInsert|2|0|
47|Next|0|33|
48|Close|0|0|
49|Sort|2|69|
50|Column|2|0|
51|MemStore|7|0|
52|MemLoad|6|0|
53|Eq|512|58|collseq(BINARY)
54|MemMove|6|7|
55|Gosub|0|7|
56|IfMemPos|5|69|
57|Gosub|0|22|
58|AggStep|0|0|count(0)
59|Column|2|2|
60|Integer|30|0|
61|Add|0|0|
62|ToReal|0|0|
63|AggStep|2|1|sum(1)
64|Column|2|0|
65|MemStore|1|1|
66|MemInt|1|4|
67|Next|2|50|
68|Gosub|0|7|
69|OpenPseudo|3|0|
70|SetNumColumns|3|3|
71|Sort|1|80|
72|Integer|1|0|
73|Column|1|3|
74|Insert|3|0|
75|Column|3|0|
76|Column|3|1|
77|Column|3|2|
78|Callback|3|0|
79|Next|1|72|
80|Close|3|0|
81|Halt|0|0|
82|Transaction|0|0|
83|VerifyCookie|0|1|
84|Goto|0|29|
85|Noop|0|0|

The select I used was as the following

SELECT 
    COUNT(*) as number, 
    field1, 
    SUM(CAST(filter2 +30 AS float)) as column2 
FROM 
    mytable 
WHERE 
    (filter1 > '123456789'  AND filter2 > 180) 
    OR filter3=1 
GROUP BY 
    field1 
ORDER BY 
    number DESC, field1;
share|improve this question
    
What does the query plan tell you? –  Jack Maney May 7 '12 at 15:07
    
I'm feeling a bit of a newbie here. Query plan? I tried the "explain query plan" command on the file, and I got only one row: "0|0|TABLE mytable". I also tried the explain command, that yielded quite an output, but I can't figure out anything there. I'm updating the question as the explain output is too large to list here. –  Yiangos May 7 '12 at 15:18
    
    
@Jack Maney: Normally I would agree with you. However, I did read the documentation on how to generate the query plan, and did update the original question with the results, which (incidentally) are far from explanatory, and not as verbose as the documentation hints at link. –  Yiangos May 9 '12 at 19:38

1 Answer 1

Whenever you're going to be doing comparisons of a non-primary-key field, it's a good design idea to add an index into to the field(s). Too many, however, can cause INSERTs to crawl, so plan accordingly.

Also, if you have simple fields such as ones that only hold a boolean value, you may want to consider declaring it as an INTEGER instead of whatever you declared it as. Declaring it as any type not specifically defined by SQLite will cause it to default to a NUMERIC type which will take longer to compare values because it will store it internally as a double and will use the floating-point math processor instead of the integer math processor.

IMO, the GROUP BY sorting directive is sometimes a dead giveaway to an unoptimized query; its methodology involves eliminating redundant data which could have been eliminated beforehand if it hadn't been pulled out of the database to begin with.

EDIT:

I saw your query and saw there are some simple things you can do to optimize it:

  • SUM(CAST(filter2 +30 AS float)) is inefficient; why are you casting it as a float? Why not just SUM it then add 30 * the COUNT?

  • filter1 > '123456789' - Why the string comparison? Why not just use integer comparison?

share|improve this answer
    
I'll check into the table schema and get back to you on the boolean-integer-numeric issue. As regards the group by, I'm using it to consolidate the data, and report the number of records with similar values (I haven't changed the actual number of fields requested by the query, only their names). –  Yiangos May 7 '12 at 15:47
    
Unfortunately I can't edit my above comment. The boolean flag is indeed stored in an INTEGER affinity column. –  Yiangos May 7 '12 at 15:57
    
No, it's NUMERIC. See the table here. –  amphetamachine May 7 '12 at 16:06
1  
No, what I meant is that the actual "CREATE TABLE" command has the "boolean" column as INTEGER type. –  Yiangos May 7 '12 at 16:08
    
The sum: The final number that might be reached by the sum can go over the 32-bit limit of an integer. This was a fix I applied on the query the first time I saw negative values in a result. Would a change of affinity from integer to float in the 'filter2' column result in better performance? the filter1: it's not really an integer in there. it could have been 'ABCDEFGHIJ' –  Yiangos May 7 '12 at 16:36

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