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I am trying to learn how to use require.js. So I made an HTML page with the following tags in the body.

<script type="text/javascript" data-main="../js/shirt" src="../js/require.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    alert("Shirt color is " + shirt.color);
</script>

The ../js/shirt.js has the following code

define({
    color: "black",
    size : "large"
});

How can I use this simple value pairs in my html?

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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

the contents of the main file should be a require call. for example, you have a values.js module containing:

define({
    color: "black",
    size : "large"
});

in your main file (shirt.js), load the values.js as a dependency (assuming they are in the same directory):

require(['values'],function(values){
    //values.color
    //values.size
});
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I changed 'alert("Shirt color is " + shirt.color);' line to 'require(["shirt"],function(shirt){alert("Shirt color is " + shirt.color);});', and I got what I was looking for. Thank your for your example. –  eDev May 7 '12 at 16:01
    
One suggestion. The file names in your answer do not correspond to the file names in the question. Better to use the file names in the question..or use altogether different ones. –  dips Mar 21 '13 at 4:00
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In addition to Domenic's answer maybe you prefer this way of using the define function without using require functions inside the modules.

// shirt.js
define({
    color: "black",
    size : "large"
});

// logger.js
define(["shirt"], function (shirt) {
    return {
        logTheShirt: function () {
            console.log("color: " + shirt.color + ", size: " + shirt.size);
        }
    };
});

// main.js
define(["shirt", "logger"],function (shirt, logger) {    
    alert("Shirt color is: " + shirt.color);
    logger.logTheShirt();
});

I prefer this way, but it's only a matter of taste I guess. (I'm assuming that all the scripts are on the same folder.)

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In addition to Joseph's answer, you can also write other modules that depend on shirt (which is where the real power of RequireJS comes in).

// shirt.js
define({
    color: "black",
    size : "large"
});

// logger.js
define(function (require) {
    var shirt = require("./shirt");

    return {
        logTheShirt: function () {
            console.log("color: " + shirt.color + ", size: " + shirt.size);
        }
    };
});

// main.js
define(function (require) {
    var shirt = require("./shirt");
    var logger = require("./logger");

    alert("Shirt color is: " + shirt.color);
    logger.logTheShirt();
});

Then your HTML can just be

<script data-main="../js/main" src="../js/require.js"></script>
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You can not use Javascript variables in HTML.

JavaScript is a programming language -> by program I mean something which performs some action. Where as HTML is just a MarkUp language -> no action here, just define how things will be arranged.

But in a way, you can still use these variables in your page -> Using JavaScript and not HTML.

//main.js
define(function (require) {
    var shirt = require("./shirt");
});

// shirt.js
define({
    color: "black",
    size : "large"
});

// Your HTML
<script type="text/javascript" data-main="../js/main" src="../js/require.js"></script>
<h1 id="shirt_color_h1"></h1>
<h1 id="shirt_size_h1"></h1>
<script type="text/javascript">
    document.getElementById("shirt_color_h1").innerHTML = shirt.color;
    document.getElementById("shirt_size_h1").innerHTML = shirt.size;
</script>

So, here HTML is just making two elements and showing them. Now you are changing the content of these blocks using JavaScript.

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