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I like to comment out parts of my code while testing but in Ruby it's not so easy as compared to other languages. I'm aware of the current Ruby ways to comment but wonder if an alternative is possible. The code here is obviously not working, and i guess many have reasons not to do so, but could it be done ?

def /*
  =begin
end
def */
  =end
end

/*testing*/
//testing

/*
testing
on multiple lines
*/

puts 'test'
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Do you want to know how to hack ruby parser, or do you want to comment some code? What's your quertion? –  Sergio Tulentsev May 7 '12 at 16:04
    
i wonder if it is possible to make possible commenting like that in Ruby, hacking the Ruby decoder is above my expectations –  peter May 7 '12 at 16:06
4  
Of course you could make it work, but that would mean that you'd have to fork Ruby and modify the parser to make it work. But there's no good or compelling reason to do so. –  Andrew Marshall May 7 '12 at 16:52
2  
@peter No, the answer is that it can't be done. It is not a case of technical limitations, the language doesn't support this. Regardless of how you make this work, as soon as you do you are no longer writing Ruby. You'll have produced a broken dialect of Ruby that only your interpreter understands. –  meagar May 7 '12 at 16:59
1  
Without forking Ruby or otherwise twiddling with its parser, you can always invoke the C pre-processor or the m4 pre-processor as part of a build process to transform your code in practically any way you want. Of course, this makes your code non-portable without also bringing your build environment along with it. –  Stephen P May 7 '12 at 17:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can comment out multiple lines by using =begin and =end, but they must be located at the beginning of the line.

class TestClass

  def my_method

  end

=begin
  def another_method
    # ...
  end
=end

end

Beyond this, the answer is that it can't be done. You cannot use C-style multiline comments in Ruby. It is not a case of technical limitations, the language doesn't support this. Regardless of how you make this work, as soon as you do you are no longer writing Ruby. You'll have produced a broken dialect of Ruby that only your interpreter understands.

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2  
I (personally) never use this syntax. textmate makes it much easier :) –  Sergio Tulentsev May 7 '12 at 16:11
    
thanks, but i'm aware of the existing possibilities, edited my question to make that clear, that they have to be at the beginning of the line is one of the reasons i often wish there was an alternative other than put a # on every line or this technique (or others that are not better) –  peter May 7 '12 at 16:12
    
@Sergio That's wonderful for you and Textmate. I don't use it. –  meagar May 7 '12 at 17:12

Modern editors/IDEs should facilitate mass code commenting. I used IDEA and TextMate, they both allow it. You select a piece of code, hit Cmd+/ and all lines get commented out with single-line comments. Hit Cmd+/ again and code is uncommented. Very handy.

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thanks, but i'm aware of the existing possibilities, edited my question to make that clear –  peter May 7 '12 at 16:12
    
Well, then you have no choice but to hack on ruby parser if you want C-style comments. –  Sergio Tulentsev May 7 '12 at 16:14

Ruby comments start with # character outside of a string literal.

You can comment out multiple lines at a time by using your editor's "column" mode to insert # as the first character on a line.

Example:

def foo
#  ...
#end
#def bar
#  ...
end
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thanks, but i'm aware of the existing possibilities, edited my question to make that clear –  peter May 7 '12 at 16:13

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