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I am working on an application that allows users to build a "book" from a number of "pages" and then place them in any order that they'd like. It's possible that multiple people can build the same book (the same pages in the same order). The books are built by the user prior to them being processed and printed, so I need to group books together that have the same exact layout (the same pages in the same order). I've written a million queries in my life, but for some reason I can't grasp how to do this.

I could simply write a big SELECT query, and then loop through the results and build arrays of objects that have the same pages in the same sequence, but I'm trying to figure out how to do this with one query.

Here is my data layout:

dbo.Books

BookId
Quantity

dbo.BookPages

BookId
PageId
Sequence

dbo.Pages

PageId
DocName
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What is Books.Quantity? The number of pages? –  Andriy M May 7 '12 at 16:30
    
Transact-SQL – Sybase or SQL Server? If the latter, which version? –  Andriy M May 7 '12 at 16:31
    
IBM midrange iSeries –  Eric Belair May 7 '12 at 16:41
    
Books.Quantity is the number of Books to be printed. –  Eric Belair May 7 '12 at 16:41
    
So it's not Transact-SQL then. I retagged your question. –  Andriy M May 7 '12 at 18:09

2 Answers 2

So, I need some clarification on a few things:

  • Once a user orders the pages the way they want, are they saved back down to a database?
  • If yes, then is the question to run a query to group book orders that have the same page-numbering, so that they are sent to the printers in an optimal way?
  • OR, does the user layout the pages, then send the order directly to the printer? And if so, it seems more complicated/less efficient to capture requested print jobs, and order them on-the-fly on the way out to the printers ...
  • What language/technology are you using to create this solution? .NET? Java?

With the answers to these questions, I can better gauge what you need.


With the answers to my questions, I also assume that:

  • You are using some type of many-to-many table to store customer page ordering. If so, then you'll need to write a query to select distinct page-orderings, and group by those page orderings. This is possible with a single SQL query.
  • However, if you feel you want more control over how this data is joined, then doing this programmatically may be the way to go, although you will lose performance by reading in all the data, and then outputting that data in a way that is consumable by your printers.
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"Once a user orders the pages the way they want, are they saved back down to a database?": YES "If yes, then is the question to run a query to group book orders that have the same page-numbering, so that they are sent to the printers in an optimal way?": YES "What language/technology are you using to create this solution? .NET? Java?": ColdFusion/IBM iSeries –  Eric Belair May 7 '12 at 16:16

The books are identical only if the page count = match count.

It was tagged TSQL when I started. This may not be the same syntax on SQL.

;WITH BookPageCount
AS
(
    select b1.bookID, COUNT(*) as [individualCount]
    from book b1 with (nolock)
    group by b1.bookID 
),
BookCombinedCount
AS
(
    select b1.bookID as [book1ID], b2.bookID as [book2ID], COUNT(*) as [combindCount]
    from book b1 with (nolock)
    join book b2 with (nolock)
    on b1.bookID < b2.bookID 
    and b1.squence = b2.squence 
    and b1.page = b2.page
    group by b1.bookID, b2.bookID
)
select BookCombinedCount.book1ID, BookCombinedCount.book2ID
from BookCombinedCount 
join BookPageCount as book1 on book1.bookID = BookCombinedCount.book1ID 
join BookPageCount as book2 on book2.bookID = BookCombinedCount.book2ID 
where BookCombinedCount.combindCount = book1.individualCount
  and BookCombinedCount.combindCount = book2.individualCount.PageCount
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