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i want to extract number string values of a char array. Actually I want to extract numbers embeded in file names for some file management. For example if there is a file name as file21 then i want the decimal number 21 from this file name.

How can i extract these values?

I tried the following but it results in an unexpected value. I think it is as a result of the implicit typecasting from the char to int while doing the arthimetic operation.

char * fname;
cout<<"enter file name";
cin>>fname;

int filenum=fname[4]%10+fname[5];
cout<<"file number is"<<filenum;

NOTE: The filenamse are strictly in the format fileXX, XX being numbers between 01 and 99

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1  
If the string had something like "A3L5", would you want 35? –  chris May 7 '12 at 16:22
    
This code is wrong in many ways but try inputting to std::string fname; instead of to a char*, and take it from there. What happens if user inputs 1 char only? Poof. –  Steve Townsend May 7 '12 at 16:22
1  
@chris: the filename are strictly in the format file22.tx –  gcmn May 7 '12 at 16:24
    
@chris: the filename are strictly in the format file22.tx –  gcmn May 7 '12 at 16:25
    
Oh, wouldn't a stringstream ss (file); ss >> someInt; work then? –  chris May 7 '12 at 16:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to subtract '0' to get the decimal value of a digit character:

int filenum=(fname[4]-'0')*10+(fname[5]-'0');

Better yet, you should use atoi:

int filenum = atoi(fname+4);
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2  
Why use atoi when there are C++ alternatives? –  chris May 7 '12 at 16:24
    
@chris C++ alternatives are somewhat more convoluted, even compared to the OP's idea of "parsing" the number manually. atoi is a first class member of C++ standard library, why not use it on something that's decidedly not that C++ - ish to begin with? –  dasblinkenlight May 7 '12 at 16:26
    
True, the question is vastly more C than C++. Never a bad time to get started though imo. –  chris May 7 '12 at 16:27
    
hah, then scanf("file%d.txt", &filenum); beats everything, hands down. –  Agent_L May 7 '12 at 16:54
    
@Agent_L I wouldn't call it "hands down": anything that involves more typing cannot be hands down by the very definition of hands down :) –  dasblinkenlight May 7 '12 at 16:56

You're getting undefined behavior because you're never allocating memory for the char* you read into:

char * fname = new char[16];  //should be enough for your filename format

or better yet

char fname[16];

Also, what do you expect:

fname[4]%10+fname[5];

to do? Magically concatenate the numbers?

First, you convert the first char to an int, multiply it by 10, convert the second char to an int and add to the first one. A simple google search for char to int would get you there.

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How can i extract these values?

There are an infinite number of ways. One way is to use std::istringstream:

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>

int main () {
  std::string fname;
  std::cout << "Enter file name: ";
  std::getline(std::cin, fname);

  int filenum;
  std::istringstream stream(fname.substr(4,2));

  if(stream >> filenum)
    std::cout << "file number is " << filenum << "\n";
  else
    std::cout << "Merde\n";
}
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Here is the simplest code:

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
  int filenum;
  string fname;
  cout<<"enter file name";
  cin>>fname;

  string str2 = fname.substr(4,2);
  istringstream(str2) >> filenum;
  cout<<"file number is"<<filenum;
  return 0;
}
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If your input is that much defined, the simplest solution is scanf:

int main()
{
    int theNumber = 0;
    scanf("file%d.txt", &theNumber);
    printf("your number is %d", theNumber);
}

Check it out in action, reading from char* instead of stdio: http://codepad.org/JFqS70yI

scanf (and sscanf) also throws in checking for proper input format: returns number of fields read successfully. In this case if return value is any other than 1, the input was wrong.

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