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I am looking for a solid open source audio compression library for java. I am working on a closed sourced project, so no copy left licenses. But I am interested in both lossless and lossy.

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A lot of people (game programmers I know) use ogg/vorbis. jcraft.com/jorbis jcraft.com/jorbis/tutorial/Tutorial.html It is lossy, but perhaps a bit less so than mp3. –  Phil Freihofner May 11 '12 at 8:50

1 Answer 1

http://flac.sourceforge.net/license.html <-- BSD license / lossless

http://jflac.sourceforge.net/ << Apache license / lossless

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Have you used jFlac before? Can you verify its reliability? I believe the license is GNU public which is a copy left license. Thanks. –  b3bop May 7 '12 at 18:24
    
I have not used jflac, hopefully someone else can comment on it's reliability. See right sidebar for license: sourceforge.net/projects/jflac. The license file in the download doesn't say apache, but looks like it to me. –  Brian Maltzan May 7 '12 at 19:04
    
The license in the distribution I have is definitely GNU public. Also, it looks like jFlac died before anyone ported the "co" part of the codec. So that's really just a "dec". –  b3bop May 7 '12 at 19:10

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