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How do I combine LINQ expressions into one?

public bool IsUnique(params Expression<Func<Employee, bool>>[] properties)
{
    var combinedProperties = Combine(properties);
    var rowCount = _session.QueryOver<Employee>().Where(combinedProperties).ToRowCountQuery().RowCount();
    return rowCount == 0;
}

Expression<Func<Employee, bool>> Combine(Expression<Func<Employee, bool>>[] properties)
{
    ???
}

Usage:

var isUnique = _employeeRepository.IsUnique(x => x.FirstName == commandMessage.FirstName, x => x.LastName == commandMessage.LastName);

Is there a way of combining predicates with an AND operator?

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marked as duplicate by casperOne May 8 '12 at 19:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The simplest way would be to loop over your params array and call .Where for each expression.

Pseudo
var query = _session.QueryOver<Employee>()
for each expression in expressions
   query = query.Where(expression)

I know this isn't precisely what you asked, but it may be good enough as it achieves the overall goal?

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I think an extension method would be more useful and will work with all your IEnumerable queries:

public static class MyExtensions
{
    // usage:
    // myList.CombinedWhere(x => x.Name == "John", x => x.City == "Miami", x => x.Code > 5);
    public static IEnumerable<T> CombinedWhere<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source,
        params Func<T, bool>[] predicates)
    {
        var query = source.Where(l => true);
        foreach(var pred in predicates)
        {
            query = query.Where (pred);
        }
        return query;
    }
}

Use this just like you would use the Where extension except you can use a variable number of arguments.

With the addition of the above extension, your code changes slightly:

public bool IsUnique(params Func<Employee, bool>[] predicates)
{
    var rowCount = _session.QueryOver<Employee>()
             .CombinedWhere(predicates).ToRowCountQuery().RowCount();
    return rowCount == 0;
}

var isUnique = _employeeRepository.IsUnique(
             x => x.FirstName == commandMessage.FirstName,
             x => x.LastName == commandMessage.LastName);

Actually, now that I look at it, you might just be able to boil it down to one expression:

var isUnique = (_session.QueryOver<Employee>()
   .CombinedWhere( 
        x => x.FirstName == commandMessage.FirstName, 
        x => x.LastName == commandMessage.LastName)
   .ToRowCountQuery()
   .RowCount()) == 0; // == 1?
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Yes you can use LinqKit with .Invoke()

Expression<Func<Purchase,bool>> criteria1 = p => p.Price > 1000;
Expression<Func<Purchase,bool>> criteria2 = p => criteria1.Invoke (p)
                                                 || p.Description.Contains ("a");
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Thanks to Brad Rem and Kenneth Ito they gave me some inspirations.

Here is the solution that works for NHibernate's IQueryOver API.

Repository:

public bool IsUnique(int id, params Expression<Func<T, bool>>[] properties)
{
    var rowCount = _session.QueryOver<T>().CombinedWhere(properties).ToRowCountQuery().RowCount();
    // create
    if (id == 0)
    {
        return rowCount == 0;
    }
    // update
    return rowCount <= 1;
}

IQueryOver Extension:

public static class IQueryOverExtension
{
    public static IQueryOver<T, T> CombinedWhere<T>(this IQueryOver<T, T> source, params Expression<Func<T, bool>>[] predicates)
    {
        return predicates.Aggregate(source, (current, predicate) => current.Where(predicate));
    }
}
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