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My teacher specifically requested that we split a sentence into words without using String.split(). I've done it using a Vector (which we haven't learned), a while loop, and substrings. What are other ways of accomplishing this? (preferably without using Vectors/ArrayLists).

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What is the exact statement of the problem? Does it just enumerate what you can't use? Any other hints? –  Tudor May 7 '12 at 17:08
3  
Don't get into the habit of using Vector, it's been replaced by ArrayList. –  Marko Topolnik May 7 '12 at 17:13
1  
If your teacher requested it then he is hoping that YOU could do it by yourself and not asking others to do it for you. I think he wants you to do something using the String's indexOf(String, int) method. –  Flavio Cysne May 7 '12 at 17:34
    
@FlavioCysne It was on a test. I used indexOf on the test, but the code seemed messy. I was looking for a cleaner way to do it. –  Linksku May 8 '12 at 0:58

10 Answers 10

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I believe that your teacher is asking you to process the string yourself (without using any other libraries to do it for you). Check to see if this is the case - if you can use them, there are things such as StringTokenizer, Pattern, and Scanner to facilitate string processing.

Otherwise...

You will need a list of word separators (such as space, tab, period, etc...) and then walk the array, building a string a character at a time until you hit the word separator. After finding a complete word (you have encountered a word separator character), save it the variable out into your structure (or whatever is required), reset the variable you are building the word in and continue.

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1  
You don't really need a list of word separators. You can just use Character.isWhitepace. –  trutheality May 7 '12 at 17:27
    
string.split() allows you to separate words that are delineated with characters other than whitespace, so it would make sense to implement a list of separators. –  A D May 7 '12 at 19:23
    
@trutheality how would you tokenize strings that have parenthesis, commas, or other odd characters that are neither whitespace nor word characters (likely depends on how the specification/assignment is written)? It might be easier/better to implement it testing for Character.isLetter –  MichaelT May 7 '12 at 20:48
    
@MichaelTurner if you use Character.isLetter things might go wrong when you encounter numbers, and before you suggest adding Character.isDigit to the mix, should_stuff_like_this_be_separated? What about sentences with decimal numbers like 12,000.75, the decimal point and thousands marker should be kept, but commas and full stops should be omitted, right? I would use whatever is most appropriate for the specifics of the task (which wasn't very specific). Using a list of characters is more general than Character.isWhitespace, but sometimes being too general is overkill. –  trutheality May 7 '12 at 20:56
2  
@trutheality excellent point about numbers and "12,000.75" is a beautiful example of the difficulty in tokenizing a string. It goes back to the specifications/assignment asking "what is required?". –  MichaelT May 7 '12 at 21:18

Parsing the string character by character, copying each character into a new String, and stopping when you reach a white space character. Then start a new string and continue until you reach the end of the original string.

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You can use java.util.Scanner.

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Or use a Pattern (also known as a regular expression) to try to match the words.

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  • Use a Scanner with ctor (String)
  • regular expressions and match
  • StringTokenizer
  • iterating yourself char by char
  • recursive iteration
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You can use java.util.StringTokenizer to split a text using desired delimiter. Default delimiter is SPACE/TAB/NEW_LINE.

String myTextToBeSplit = "This is the text to be split into words.";  
StringTokenizer tokenizer = new StringTokenizer( myTextToBeSplit );  
while ( tokinizer.hasMoreTokens()) {  
    String word = tokinizer.nextToken();  
    System.out.println( word ); // word you are looking in  
}  

As an alternate you can also use java.util.Scanner

Scanner s = new Scanner(myTextToBeSplit).useDelimiter("\\s");  
while( s.hasNext() ) {  
System.out.println(s.next());  
}  
s.close();  
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Without using a Vector/List (and without manually re-implementing their ability to re-size themselves for your function), you can take advantage of the simple observation that a string of length N cannot have more than (N+1)/2 words (in integer division). You can declare an array of strings of that size, populate it the same way you populated that Vector, and then copy the results to an array of the size of the number of words you found.

So:

String[] mySplit( String in ){
    String[] bigArray = new String[ (in.length()+1)/2 ];

    int numWords = 0;
    // Populate bigArray with your while loop and keep
    // track of the number of words

    String[] result = new String[numWords];
    // Copy results from bigArray to result

    return result;
}
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public class MySplit {

public static String[] mySplit(String text,String delemeter){
    java.util.List<String> parts = new java.util.ArrayList<String>();
    text+=delemeter;        

    for (int i = text.indexOf(delemeter), j=0; i != -1;) {
        parts.add(text.substring(j,i));
        j=i+delemeter.length();
        i = text.indexOf(delemeter,j);
    }


    return parts.toArray(new String[0]);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String str="012ab567ab0123ab";
    String delemeter="ab";
    String result[]=mySplit(str,delemeter);
    for(String s:result)
        System.out.println(s);
}

}
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You can also use String.substring or charAt[]

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