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Here is my module:

MyModule = (function () {

    var myModule = function MyModule(strInput) {
        if (false === (this instanceof MyModule)) {
            return new MyModule();
        }

       var str = strInput;
       this.getStr = function () {
           return str;
       }

       this.test = function () {
           var testModule = new MyModule("testInside");
           return testModule;
       }

   }

    return myModule;    
}());

Here is how I test my module:

document.getElementById("Button").onclick = function () {
    var module = new MyModule("input");
    var module2 = module.test();

    console.log(module2.getStr());
    console.log(module.getStr());
}

This code returns:

testInside   
testInside

to the console.log, but what I expect is:

testInside    
input  

like I do in c# or java when I build a new class inside the same class.

Thanks in advance for your help.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

i don't know what exactly i did, just got it by fluke. But please, don't confuse the reader by using MyModule twice. Anyways, this is all i did:

MyModule = (function() {

    return function M(strInput) {
        if (false === (this instanceof M)) {
            return new M();
        }

        var str = strInput;
        this.getStr = function() {
            return str;
        }

        this.test = function() {
            var testModule = new M("testInside");
            return testModule;
        }

    }
}());
// while testing.
var module = new MyModule("input");
var module2 = module.test();

console.log(module2.getStr());
console.log(module.getStr());

UPDATE: there's a simpler solution. I just copy-paste-edited your code so there wasn't much variation. This is the simplest one:

MyModule = function(strInput) {
    if (false === (this instanceof MyModule)) {
        return new MyModule();
    }

    var str = strInput;
    this.getStr = function() {
        return str;
    }

    this.test = function() {
        var testModule = new MyModule("testInside");
        return testModule;
    }

};
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, now I don't understand the difference between a class and a module. lol – Alphapage May 7 '12 at 17:44
    
well...the reason i removed the closure is that your example didn't need it anyways. If you do need it, try the above method (the non-updated one). – Parth Thakkar May 7 '12 at 17:45

The problem is this line in MyModule:

var str = strInput;

It should be:

this.str = strInput;

Because otherwise str will always point to the the same variable and have the value that has been set last.

share|improve this answer
    
I get: undefined undefined – Alphapage May 7 '12 at 17:32
    
I also want to keep str private var. – Alphapage May 7 '12 at 17:33
    
Ok, but str is not private now. I can't keep encapsulation. – Alphapage May 7 '12 at 17:35
    
But I want to keep encapsulation. – Alphapage May 7 '12 at 17:35
    
Maybe you need return this.str; too. But actually I guess I am wrong, because it should work as you did it too ;). – maenu May 7 '12 at 17:35

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