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I have a composite primary key in my Candidate table

CREATE TABLE CANDIDATE(
CANDIDATE_ID VARCHAR(5),
NAME VARCHAR(30),
TELEPHONE NUMBER,
PRIMARY KEY(CANDIDATE_ID, NAME));

When I create a child table, I get an error saying the number of referencing columns must match referenced columns when I create a foreign key for the CANDIDATE_ID

CREATE TABLE JOB(
POSITION_ID VARCHAR(5) PRIMARY KEY,
CANDIDATE_ID VARCHAR(5),
DATE2 DATE,
FOREIGN KEY(CANDIDATE_ID) REFERENCES CANDIDATE); 
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1  
Why did you choose to make a composite primary key? Isn't CANDIDATE_ID enough for a unique key? –  rayd09 May 7 '12 at 18:32
    
i chose it because it will be more efficient of doing this and more better for this particular work –  john May 7 '12 at 18:33

3 Answers 3

A table can only have one primary key-- you have a composite primary key. If you have a composite primary key, you have to reference the entire key in your child table. That would mean that the child table would need to have a CANDIDATE_ID column and a NAME column.

CREATE TABLE job (
  position_id VARCHAR2(5) PRIMARY KEY,
  candidate_id VARCHAR2(5),
  name         VARCHAR2(30),
  date2        DATE,
  FOREIGN KEY( candidate_id, name ) REFERENCES candidate( candidate_id, name )
);

Of course, you probably don't want to store the name in both tables. You probably want the candidate_id to be the prmiary key of candidate and you may want to create a separate unique constraint on name.

CREATE TABLE CANDIDATE(
  CANDIDATE_ID VARCHAR(5) primary key,
  NAME VARCHAR(30) unique,
  TELEPHONE NUMBER);

CREATE TABLE JOB(
  POSITION_ID VARCHAR(5) PRIMARY KEY,
  CANDIDATE_ID VARCHAR(5),
  DATE2 DATE,
  FOREIGN KEY(CANDIDATE_ID) REFERENCES CANDIDATE(candidate_id)); 
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so what is the difference between unique and primary key because there basically the same meaning –  john May 7 '12 at 18:47
    
@john - A table can have 1 and only 1 primary key. A primary key should be immutable (i.e. it should never be updated). And that's what should be used in foreign keys. A table can have many different unique constraints based on business rules but those rules may change over time and the data in the columns may change over time (i.e. Sarah SMith may become Sarah Jones). Child tables should not use simple unique constraints when defining foreign key relations because that data is subject to change. –  Justin Cave May 7 '12 at 21:07

Assuming that the combination of CANDIDATE_ID and NAME is required for the key to be unique, then you will need to add a reference to the NAME column in your referencing table.

I suspect that CANDIDATE_ID is enough to uniquely identify the candidates in your primary table. If that is the case then it should be your primary key and your relationship will work. If you want to index the NAME separately then do so, but leave it out of the primary key.

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Last line should be like this;

CONSTRAINT FK_CANDIDATE_ID FOREIGN KEY (CANDIDATE_ID)REFERENCES CANDIDATE(CANDIDATE_ID);

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when i type the code in, it says no matching unique or primary key for this column list –  john May 7 '12 at 19:05

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