Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just noticed that my socket client wasn't receiving the same data the server was sending back to it. The text gets cut off after 8192 characters.

Is there some limit I am not aware of? How do I get past this?

The client uses this code:

//Send and Receive
public string sendAndReceiveMSG(string msg)
{
    try
    {
        NetworkStream serverStream = clientSocket.GetStream();
        string sendresponse = sendMSG(msg, serverStream);
        if (sendresponse == "ConnectionCrash")
        {
            return sendresponse;
        }
        else if (sendresponse == "OK")
        {
            string receiveresponse = receiveMSG(serverStream);
            return receiveresponse;
        }
        return "UnknownErrorInternal";
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        return "UnknownErrorInternal";
    }
}

//Send msg
private string sendMSG(string msg, NetworkStream serverStream)
{
    try
    {
        byte[] outStream = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(msg);
        serverStream.Write(outStream, 0, outStream.Length);
        serverStream.Flush();
        return "OK";
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        endSock();
        return "ConnectionCrash";
    }
}

//Receive msg
private string receiveMSG(NetworkStream serverStream)
{
    try
    {
        byte[] inStream = new byte[10025];

        int buffSize = clientSocket.ReceiveBufferSize;
        dynamic bytesRead = serverStream.Read(inStream, 0, buffSize);

        string returndata = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(inStream, 0, bytesRead);
        return returndata;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        endSock();
        return "ConnectionCrash";
    }
}

The client then gets a response from the server like so;

string recv = client.sendAndReceiveMSG("someRequest");
share|improve this question
    
You need to loop through and continue reading while there's still data to be read. –  zimdanen May 7 '12 at 18:43
    
There's a reason it's called a stream. Bytes go in one end and come out the other. Yoda says "there is no message". –  HABO May 7 '12 at 18:46
    
Why is bytesRead dynamic? –  Chris Dunaway May 7 '12 at 19:09
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have only processed one call to Read. This behaviour is entirely expected; you very rarely get all the data in a single packet (frankly I'm amazed you didn't notice it sooner).

You need to decide on a "framing" policy (i.e. how you distinguish each sub-message - maybe new lines if text based, or length-prefix for binary) - and obtain a frames worth of data before processing. This usually means calling Read in a loop, or (for text) using something like a StreamReader which handles that for you (i.e. calling ReadLine() in a loop).

If there is only one message on the socket, and the caller closes their connection, you can dispense with framing, and just read until Read returns something non-positive (i.e. EOF).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I googled framing policy and came across this codeproject article which also explained why I had not noticed this until now. –  natli May 8 '12 at 0:18
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.