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I have two divs inside another div, and I want to position one child div to the top right of the parent div, and the other child div to the bottom of the parent div using css. Ie, I want to use absolute positioning with the two child divs, but position them relative to the parent div rather than the page. How can I do this?

Sample html:

<div id="father">
   <div id="son1"></div>
   <div id="son2"></div>
</div>
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You want son1 to be in the top right corner of father but where on the bottom should son2 be? Bottom left, right, or center? –  j08691 May 7 '12 at 18:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 128 down vote accepted
#father {
   position: relative;
}

#son1 {
   position: absolute;
   top: 0;
}

#son2 {
   position: absolute;
   bottom: 0;
}

This works because position: absolute means something like "use top, right, bottom, left to position yourself in relation to the nearest ancestor who has position: absolute or position: relative."

So we make #father have position: relative, and the children have position: absolute, then use top and bottom to position the children.

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thanks a lot. can you explain me how it work so why? –  BlaShadow May 7 '12 at 19:37
1  
Thanks, this saved my ass from a strange bug I had with div position! –  Alexis Leclerc Jun 19 '13 at 18:49
    
Why is #father { position: relative; } required? –  mathguy54 Aug 2 at 5:18
    
is required to change the "position rule" for those who are inside him. –  BlaShadow Aug 2 at 17:28
1  
@mathguy54 Because the spec says absolutely positioned elements are positioned relative to the first positioned parent, which means any parent that doesn't have a position value of static. –  Alex W Aug 7 at 13:32
div#father { position: relative; }
div#son1 { position: absolute; /* put your coords here */ }
div#son2 { position: absolute; /* put your coords here */ }
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1  
Just a small note to the person who proposed an edit: I appreciate you looking out for answer quality, but wanted to point out that it is not entirely redundant to have the element type prior to the id selector. Since it is possible for stylesheets to serve in multiple contexts, it is possible that this sheet might be used in a context where div#father does not exist, but #father does. –  Brian Warshaw Oct 7 '13 at 17:37

if u dont give any position to parent than it by default takes static . if u want to understand that diffreence refer this example

Example 1::

http://jsfiddle.net/Cr9KB/1/

   #mainall
{

    background-color:red;
    height:150px;
    overflow:scroll
}

here parent class has no position so element is placed according to body .

Example 2::

http://jsfiddle.net/Cr9KB/2/

#mainall
{
    position:relative;
    background-color:red;
    height:150px;
    overflow:scroll
}

In this exaple parent has relative position hence element are positioned absolute inside relative parent.

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