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I have two divs inside another div, and I want to position one child div to the top right of the parent div, and the other child div to the bottom of the parent div using css. Ie, I want to use absolute positioning with the two child divs, but position them relative to the parent div rather than the page. How can I do this?

Sample html:

<div id="father">
   <div id="son1"></div>
   <div id="son2"></div>
</div>
share|improve this question
    
You want son1 to be in the top right corner of father but where on the bottom should son2 be? Bottom left, right, or center? – j08691 May 7 '12 at 18:45
up vote 334 down vote accepted
#father {
   position: relative;
}

#son1 {
   position: absolute;
   top: 0;
}

#son2 {
   position: absolute;
   bottom: 0;
}

This works because position: absolute means something like "use top, right, bottom, left to position yourself in relation to the nearest ancestor who has position: absolute or position: relative."

So we make #father have position: relative, and the children have position: absolute, then use top and bottom to position the children.

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thanks a lot. can you explain me how it work so why? – BlaShadow May 7 '12 at 19:37
    
Why is #father { position: relative; } required? – joshreesjones Aug 2 '14 at 5:18
    
is required to change the "position rule" for those who are inside him. – BlaShadow Aug 2 '14 at 17:28
4  
@mathguy54 Because the spec says absolutely positioned elements are positioned relative to the first positioned parent, which means any parent that doesn't have a position value of static. – Alex W Aug 7 '14 at 13:32
    
what about such scenario: FATHER is relative and its height is 100% how to position son and son2 at, let's say 20% and 70% of teh father's height respectively? – Rossitten Mar 8 '15 at 5:56
div#father {
    position: relative;
}
div#son1 {
    position: absolute;
    /* put your coords here */
}
div#son2 {
    position: absolute;
    /* put your coords here */
}
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If you don't give any position to parent then by default it takes static. If you want to understand that difference refer to this example

Example 1::

http://jsfiddle.net/Cr9KB/1/

   #mainall
{

    background-color:red;
    height:150px;
    overflow:scroll
}

Here parent class has no position so element is placed according to body.

Example 2::

http://jsfiddle.net/Cr9KB/2/

#mainall
{
    position:relative;
    background-color:red;
    height:150px;
    overflow:scroll
}

In this example parent has relative position hence element are positioned absolute inside relative parent.

share|improve this answer
    
And, what about if you don't have the #mainall{height:150px}...? I mean, if mainall has dynamic height? – Albert Català Sep 8 '15 at 15:02
    
then your floating element will be relative to the position that the parent element had when the page (and the css) was loaded. If you want to update that after the page load, use javascript - clientX and clientY are a good place to start – Black_Stormy Mar 21 at 12:00

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