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I have some expensive test setup that is only necessary for a handful of examples in my spec, and, if necessary, it only needs to run once. Because it is slow, I am trying to avoid putting it in a before(:each) block, but before(:all) doesn't seem to suit my needs. I think a complicating factor is that the expensive part must run AFTER some other common setup. (This is a capybara test for an app with a search engine. After creating some records, I need to index the test database in order to get search results.) My setup is like this:

feature 'some particular feature' do
  before(:each) do
    # a bunch of common test setup (creating records that this test will use)
  end

  describe 'simple example #1' do
    # a simple example that doesn't need the expensive setup
  end
  .
  .
  .
  describe 'simple example #N' do
    # a simple example that doesn't need the expensive setup
  end

  describe 'a more complicated example' do
    before(:all) do
      # expensive_setup that depends on the records created above
    end

    it 'does something' do ... end
    it 'does something else' do ... end
    .
    .
    .
    it 'even does this' do ... end
  end      
end

The problem is that when rspec is running the examples in the context with the more complicated example, the before(:all) block runs before the before(:each) block that it depends on. So far I have had to put the expensive setup in a before(:each) block instead of a before(:all) block. This means that the expensive setup has to run for each it block inside that example. Is there a better way to do this?

Update: I failed to mention that the result of the expensive operation depends only on the database. Therefore, since each example uses the same database setup, it would be safe to re-use the result of the expensive operation for each example. Also, the result lives in the filesystem, so it won't be cleared between examples.

I'm thinking the way to go is to put some sort of marker in the filesystem indicating that the result is good and doesn't need to be re-calculated.


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The problem you are going to face is that (in most setups) database records are removed between tests. So if the expensive operation either depends on or creates db records those will be destroyed. –  Daniel Evans May 7 '12 at 23:17
    
Yeah. In this case, the result of the expensive operation lives in a directory in the filesystem. Also, I probably need to clarify that the result of the expensive operation depends only on the records in the database. (It is indexing the database for search.) Therefore, since the database setup is the same in each example, it would be safe to re-use the result from the previous example. –  speedarius May 7 '12 at 23:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I wound up working around the problem by calculating a digest of the common setup and saving that along with the results of expensive operation. Before doing the expensive operation, check if the current digest matches the one on disk. If so, there is no need to do it. Since all the examples share the common setup, the expensive operation only runs at most once.

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