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I've got some R code that looks basically like this:

compute.quantiles <- function(mu, type) {

  ## 'mu' and 'type' are vectors of the same length

  var <- ifelse(type=='a', 6.3523 * mu^2,
         ifelse(type=='b', 234.23 * mu,
         ifelse(type=='c', {s <- 9.8 * ((mu-0.3)/3)^(6/7)+0.19; mu + mu^2/s},
         ifelse(type=='d', 56.345 * mu^1.5,
         ifelse(type=='e', 0.238986 * mu^2,
         ifelse(type=='f', mu + 1.1868823 * mu^2,
         NA ))))))

  # ...then do something with var...
}

Some sample input & output:

print(compute.quantiles(2:4, c('c','d','e')))
[1]   2.643840 292.777208   3.823776

That works correctly, but it's kind of ugly with the deep nesting, so I'm wondering if there's a different idiom that works better. Anyone have a suggestion? If switch() accepted a vector as its first argument, that would work nicely, but it just takes a scalar.

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could you provide a small reproducible data set to try this out? –  Tyler Rinker May 7 '12 at 19:03
    
@TylerRinker done. –  Ken Williams May 7 '12 at 19:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think I came up with something I like better:

## Vector-switch
vswitch <- function(EXPR, ...) {
    vars <- cbind(...)
    vars[cbind(seq_along(EXPR), match(EXPR, names(list(...))))]
}

compute.quantiles <- function(mu, type) {
  stopifnot(length(mu) == length(type))

  vswitch( type,
    a = 6.3523 * mu^2,
    b = 234.23 * mu,
    c = mu + mu^2/(9.8 * ((mu-0.3)/3)^(6/7)+0.19),
    d = 56.345 * mu^1.5,
    e = 0.238986 * mu^2,
    f = mu + 1.1868823 * mu^2)
}

With the matrix-indexing code in just 2 lines, I think it's ok for my too-clever-code threshold. =)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I was contemplating your other answer and thought: why not make a vswitch function - and now you already did! Same name and everything :) –  Tommy May 8 '12 at 6:20
    
=) [52 more chars added to reach posting threshold...] –  Ken Williams May 8 '12 at 12:48

Maybe something like this is workable:

compute.quantiles <- function(mu, type) {
  stopifnot(length(mu) == length(type))

  vars <- cbind(
    a = 6.3523 * mu^2,
    b = 234.23 * mu,
    c = mu + mu^2/(9.8 * ((mu-0.3)/3)^(6/7)+0.19),
    d = 56.345 * mu^1.5,
    e = 0.238986 * mu^2,
    f = mu + 1.1868823 * mu^2)

  vars[cbind(seq_along(mu), match(type, colnames(vars)))]
}

Not sure if that's going to look too "advanced" for the future reader (including myself) though.

share|improve this answer
    
1+ But you need to replace mu[i] with mu... –  Tommy May 7 '12 at 19:32
1  
And regarding "too advanced" - you might consider a comment explaining what's goin' on... Don't fear the comments :) –  Tommy May 7 '12 at 19:39
    
...and use seq_along(mu) instead of 1:length(mu) so that you handle zero-length vectors... –  Tommy May 7 '12 at 19:41
    
Good catches @Tommy –  Ken Williams May 7 '12 at 20:22
    
And regarding the comments - I don't fear comments, but whenever I put in a comment that basically says "here's why this code is so wonky...", my gut wrenches & I end up changing the code until the comment isn't needed anymore. =) Or at least, it seems like that to me, since I've spent so much time on it that it's "obvious" in my head. =) –  Ken Williams May 7 '12 at 20:26

Here is an alternative approach:

library(data.table)
# Case selection table:
dtswitch <- data.table(type=letters[1:6],
                      result=c("6.3523 * mu^2",
                               "234.23 * mu",
                               "{s <- 9.8 * ((mu-0.3)/3)^(6/7)+0.19; mu + mu^2/s}",
                               "56.345 * mu^1.5",
                               "0.238986 * mu^2",
                               "mu + 1.1868823 * mu^2"),
                      key="type")

# Data to which you want the cases applied:
compute <- data.table(type=letters[3:5],mu=2:4,key="type")

# Join the data table with the case selection table, and evaluate the results:
dtswitch[compute,list(mu,result=eval(parse(text=result)))]
#>   type mu     result
#>1:    c  2   2.643840
#>2:    d  3 292.777208
#>3:    e  4   3.823776

Rather than creating the dtswitch table in R code, you could store it in an external spreadsheet or database and then load it into R. Might be handy if you have a lot of different cases or they are changing often and you want to control them from a central location.

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I couldn't resist adding another answer with a completely different approach. Here it is.

## Sort of a cross between tapply() and ave()
tswitch <- function(x, INDEX, ...) {
  l <- substitute(list(...))
  s <- split(x, INDEX)
  pf <- parent.frame()
  split(x, INDEX) <- lapply(names(s), function(n) 
    eval(l[[n]], list(x=s[[n]]), pf)
  )
  x
}

compute.quantiles <- function(mu, type) {
  stopifnot(length(mu) == length(type))

  tswitch(mu, type,
    a = 6.3523 * x^2,
    b = 234.23 * x,
    c = x + x^2/(9.8 * ((x-0.3)/3)^(6/7)+0.19),
    d = 56.345 * x^1.5,
    e = 0.238986 * x^2,
    f = x + 1.1868823 * x^2)
}

And the sample input & output:

> compute.quantiles(2:4, c('c','d','e'))
[1]   2.643840 292.777208   3.823776

The advantage to this implementation is that it only computes the length(mu) specific values that need to be computed. By contrast, the vswitch method above computes length(mu) * M values, where M is the number of "cases" in the switch. So if the computations are costly, or if the data is big, this version could be a win.

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