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I'm trying to get my simplex noise(basically perlin noise with nicer complexity) to work and give me something nice like this:

Perlin Noise

However, all I get is something that just seem random:

Ant war

I'm using the simplex code from here and am using it like this:

def generate(self):
    columns = []
    for x in range(0, self.width):
        rows = []
        for y in range(0, self.height):
            val = simplex.scaled_raw_noise_2d(0, 254, x, y)
            rows.append(val)
        columns.append(rows)
    return columns

Fairly straightforward but it seems I'm missing something. No idea what though

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2 Answers 2

I guess you should simply write your code as

def generate(self):
    return simplex.scaled_raw_noise_2d(0, 254, range(0, self.width), 
                                       range(0, self.width))
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This is kind of an old question, but this mustn't go unanswered! For visitors of course, even if you've figured it out on you're own.

I'm not too experienced with python, but looks to me like the problem is that the frequency is too high, 1.0 to be exact. Or in other words, the noise is zoomed out too far causing the noise to be aliased.

To "zoom in" the frequency needs to be reduced. Which would look something like this assuming there isn't another way to do it in your library.

def generate(self):
    columns = []
    frequency = 1 / 10  # zoom in 10 times
    for x in range(0, self.width):
        rows = []
        for y in range(0, self.height):
            val = simplex.scaled_raw_noise_2d(0, 254, x * frequency, y * frequency)
            rows.append(val)
        columns.append(rows)
    return columns

Just for the sake of saying it, this is how multiple octave noise (the puffy cloud looking stuff) works, it manipulates the frequency of the noise over a number of octaves, or powers of two (sometimes incorrectly called octaves for powers of a lacunarity variable) then adds them all together and normalizes, or scales to the appropriate range.

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Ahaa, interesting. I can't actually recall what I needed this for but I'll give this a try. –  dutt Feb 14 '13 at 9:31

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