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I am defining a macro before a class declaration. The macro calls a member function of the class. My sample code is below.

Sample class declaration,

// sample.h

#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#define CALCULATETEMP(a, b, c) {
int d = Sample::getTempIncrement(a,b,c);
stringstream ss;
ss << d;
cout << ss.str() << endl;
}

class Sample {
public:
    Sample();
    int getTempIncrement(int a, int b, int c);
    ~Sample();
};

Sample class implementation,

//sample.cpp

#include "sample.h"
Sample::Sample() {
}

int Sample::getTempIncrement(int a, int b, int c) {
    int temp = 5;
    int d = (a*temp) + (b+c)*temp;
    return d;
}

Sample::~Sample() {
}

Main routine,

//main.cpp

#include "sample.h"

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    int a = 1;
    int b = 2;
    int c = 3;
    CALCULATETEMP(a, b, c);
    return 0;
}

When I run the main.cpp, I am getting an error in sample.h file within the macro definition: "Sample" is not a class or namespace name.

How can I call a member function of the class outside the scope of the class and before the class declaration? I am quite new to programming, your feedback would help me, Thanks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

If you want a macro to span multiple lines, you have to put \ at the end of each line:

#define CALCULATETEMP(a, b, c) {         \
int d = Sample::getTempIncrement(a,b,c); \
stringstream ss;                         \
ss << d;                                 \
cout << ss.str() << endl;                \
}

Also, why don't you just use a function for this (and not use stringstream)?

class Sample {
public:
    Sample();
    int getTempIncrement(int a, int b, int c);
    ~Sample();
};

void calctemp(int a, int b, int c) {
    int d = Sample::getTempIncrement(a,b,c);
    stringstream ss;
    ss << d;
    cout << ss.str() << endl; // why are you using stringstream? It could be
                              // just cout << d << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
yeah, 'stringstream' was some overhead there, thanks. I was just trying macros, nothing specific about not doing it with a function. –  capricorn_heitus May 7 '12 at 19:57
    
@capricorn_heitus OK, nothing wrong with experimenting :) I just wanted to point it out in case this was real code somewhere. –  Seth Carnegie May 7 '12 at 19:57
1  
And remember, don't leave any whitespace after the '\' or you'll end up with the same problem. It'll escape the space rather than any newlines. –  Crazy Eddie May 7 '12 at 22:50

I believe there's another problem, as well. Sample::getTempIncrement() isn't declared as a static, so you'll need a Sample instance available in the macro.

share|improve this answer
    
Good catch, +1. –  Seth Carnegie May 7 '12 at 23:33

You've defined CALCULATETEMP(a,b,c) to be replaced by the preprocessor with { and then followed it with a bunch of global space coding, which is quite illegal.

I would suggest going back to the tutorial on preprocessor macros and/or reading up on inline functions.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Could you give me some information on global space coding, I didn't get the term. –  capricorn_heitus May 7 '12 at 19:54
    
@capricorn_heitus he means that because the macro is only on that first line, the compiler takes it that you are trying to do calculations outside a function (at the top-level of the file, like you can do in Python or whatever) which you can't do in C++. That and you have a stray }. –  Seth Carnegie May 7 '12 at 19:58
    
@SethCarnegie thanks, I got it now. So, the solution to this was your answer about spanning macros to multiple lines with ´\´ , which makes the calculations within the macro definition, right? –  capricorn_heitus May 7 '12 at 20:04
    
@capricorn_heitus precisely. The \ just makes the compiler ignore the newline that comes after the \ . –  Seth Carnegie May 7 '12 at 20:06
    
@SethCarnegie thank you very much –  capricorn_heitus May 7 '12 at 20:07

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