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Given an (unsigned) integer, what is the generally fastest way to convert it into a string that contains its decimal representation?

The naïve way of doing that is repeatedly dividing by 10, until you reach zero. I dislike this approach, because it

  • uses integer division, which is both slow and not available on some integrated platforms
  • requires the programmer to flip the string afterwards. This doubles the number of memory operations needed.

I thought of the following method to convert integers to decimal base. Is this a good idea? How is this done in common implementations of functions like printf ?

#include <stdint.h>

const static uint64_t i64_tab[20] = {
                     1u,
                    10u,
                   100u,
                  1000u,
                 10000u,
                100000u, /* 10^ 5 */
               1000000u,
              10000000u,
             100000000u,
            1000000000u,
           10000000000u, /* 10^10 */
          100000000000u,
         1000000000000u,
        10000000000000u,
       100000000000000u,
      1000000000000000u, /* 10^15 */
     10000000000000000u,
    100000000000000000u,
   1000000000000000000u,
  10000000000000000000u  /* 10^19 */
};

void uint64_to_string(char *out, uint64_t in) {
  int i;
  uint64_t tenpow;
  char accum;

  for (i = 19;i > 0;i--) {
    if (in >= i64_tab[i]) break;
  }

  do {
    tenpow = i64_tab[i];
    accum = '0';

    while (in >= tenpow) {
      in -= tenpow;
      accum++;
    }

    *out++ = accum;

  } while (i --> 0);

  *out = '\0';
}

const static uint32_t i32_tab[10] = {
           1u,
          10u,
         100u,
        1000u,
       10000u,
      100000u, /* 10^ 5 */
     1000000u,
    10000000u,
   100000000u,
  1000000000u, /* 10^9  */
};

void uint32_to_string(char *out, uint32_t in) {
  int i;
  uint32_t tenpow;
  char accum;

  for (i = 9;i > 0;i--)
    if (in >= i32_tab[i]) break;

  do {
    tenpow = i32_tab[i];
    accum = '0';

    while (in >= tenpow) {
      in -= tenpow;
      accum++;
    }

    *out++ = accum;

  } while (i --> 0);

  *out = '\0';
}
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3  
"Given an (unsigned) integer, what is the generally fastest way to convert it into an integer?" Do you mean if you start with a string? Because the fastest way to convert an integer to an integer is to do nothing :) –  Justin May 7 '12 at 20:18
    
@FUZxxl sorry, I always wander into the C tag by accident. –  Seth Carnegie May 7 '12 at 20:18
    
@Justin Sorry, fixed that. –  FUZxxl May 7 '12 at 20:19
    
@Seth No problem. I just kind of dislike "Just use X, I don't care nor know who it works though" –  FUZxxl May 7 '12 at 20:20
1  
Closely related: A C++ version of this same question –  Ben Voigt May 7 '12 at 20:37
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The fastest approach on all but the simplest (e.g. 8-bit) microcontrollers is to use division, but reduce the number of divisions by generating several digits at once.

You will find very highly optimized code in answers to my question here. Using it in C should be a trivial edit to eliminate std::string -- there are no C++ features used in the actual conversion. The core is

while(val>=100)
{
   int pos = val % 100;
   val /= 100;
   *(short*)(c-1)=*(short*)(digit_pairs+2*pos); // or use memcpy
   c-=2;
}
while(val>0)
{
    *c--='0' + (val % 10);
    val /= 10;
}

I also provided an optimized division-free code for 8-bit micros, similar to the idea shown in the code in the question, but without loops. It ends up with a lot of code like this:

    if (val >= 80) {
        ch |= '8';
        val -= 80;
    }
    else if (val >= 40) {
        ch |= '4';
        val -= 40;
    }
    if (val >= 20) {
        ch |= '2';
        val -= 20;
    }
    if (val >= 10) {
        ch |= '1';
        val -= 10;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
That is interesting. I'm going to write a program to compare this approach to mine. –  FUZxxl May 7 '12 at 21:08
    
@FUZxxl: I suggest you click through to that other question. Lots of code already, with performance data, and the benchmark code needed to do your own tests. –  Ben Voigt May 7 '12 at 21:09
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I believe integer division by a constant is as fast as doing a multiplication because the compiler optimizes integer division to integer multiplication for constant divisors. This is a heavy duty math trick performed by most optimizing compilers.

share|improve this answer
    
Integer multiplication is still pretty slow because it is a non-pipelined, microcoded operation, which means the entire OOO pipeline stops dead while it is executing. See the "Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Optimization Reference Manual" for x86; I can tell you from experience that it's even worse on PPC. –  Crashworks May 7 '12 at 20:42
    
@Crashworks, I don't have experience with this and I respect yours. This is very surprising. What about top-notch CPUs like Core i7? They must pipeline muls? –  usr May 7 '12 at 20:49
    
@usr I am not familiar with this optimization. Do you have a reference? The only thing I can think of is to use modular inverse, but that would only work for odd numbers. –  vhallac May 7 '12 at 20:58
    
@vhallac: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montgomery_reduction –  Ben Voigt May 7 '12 at 20:59
3  
ridiculousfish.com/blog/posts/labor-of-division-episode-i.html This blog post series is excellent. I read it a few days ago. –  usr May 7 '12 at 21:01
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The generally fastest way is to index into a big enough array of pointers to strings. One array lookup, one pointer dereference. It's heavy on memory usage, though... That's the nature of engineering tradeoffs. How fast is fast enough?

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There is no "fast enough". What ever performs best is "fast enough" –  FUZxxl May 7 '12 at 20:45
1  
Yes, there is a "fast enough", because what performs best is usually unattainable due to exorbitant resource requirements. My answer is the best example. Do you have enough memory for 2**64 pointers and the associated strings? Probably not. But I'm pretty confident that this performs best. –  Jens May 7 '12 at 20:50
1  
Nice counter-argument. On virtually all machines, a memory access is horrobly slow if not cached. It might thereby be an advantage to minimize the number of memory accesses done. –  FUZxxl May 7 '12 at 20:52
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The MS version of printf does it the "naïve" way (after setting up a bunch of variables based on the optional flags):

            while (precision-- > 0 || number != 0) {
                digit = (int)(number % radix) + '0';
                number /= radix;                /* reduce number */
                if (digit > '9') {
                    /* a hex digit, make it a letter */
                    digit += hexadd;
                }
                *text.sz-- = (char)digit;       /* store the digit */
            }
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