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I have id's validation method, each id can contain only [a-z0-9_] case insensitive characters. [^a-z] seems working, but I want to append [^0-9] but it's not work. How one string pattern should looks like?

function foo() {
  testUserIds = ['id23425860', 
  'yulka_rdtska',
  'im?sel=2000000001',
  'im?sel=2000000002'];
  for (id in testUserIds) {
    document.write(isUserIdValid(id) + '\r\n');
  }
}
function isUserIdValid(user_id) {
  var patt = new RegExp('[^a-z]', 'ig');
  return patt.test(user_id);
}
share|improve this question
    
[^a-z0-9]. Put it inside the same character class. – Michael Berkowski May 7 '12 at 20:22
    
I've tried that, it gives me wrong results: false false false false – Vasya May 7 '12 at 20:24
    
Oh, man, sorry there just my erro in for – Vasya May 7 '12 at 20:25
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that you are using a for-in construct instead of a proper for loop. Use [^a-z0-9_] as your regular expression and iterate correctly over your array.

In JavaScript, don't iterate over arrays with for (elem in arr), as that syntax's purpose is to iterate over properties of an object. Instead use for (var idx=0; idx<something; idx++).

function foo() {
  testUserIds = ['id23425860', 
  'yulka_rdtska',
  'im?sel=2000000001',
  'im?sel=2000000002'];

  // Use an incremental for loop here, NOT a for-in
  // for-in is intended for iterating over object properties, not arrays.
  for (var i=0; i<testUserIds.length; i++) {
    console.log(isUserIdValid(testUserIds[i]) + '\r\n');
  }
}
function isUserIdValid(user_id) {
  var patt = new RegExp('[^a-z0-9_]', 'ig');

  // Return the inversion of this, so isUserValid() is true if the user is valid
  return !patt.test(user_id);
}

foo();
// Outputs
true
true
false
false

Note that the way you have setup your function, it returns the opposite of what it says. You are checking for invalid characters, so return the inverted:

// If it matched, it's invalid, otherwise valid
return !patt.test(user_id);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, just checked Google Javascript Style guide they say the same. – Vasya May 7 '12 at 20:36

This is what you need:

function isUserIdValid(user_id) {
  var patt = new RegExp('[^a-z0-9_]', 'ig');
  return patt.test(user_id);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I found, my mistake was in for cycle I just passed index instead of values :) – Vasya May 7 '12 at 20:27
    
Welcome to StackOverflow! Sometimes it takes talking out your problem to someone to help you find your mistakes. :P Dont forget to accept an answer. – Josh Mein May 7 '12 at 20:31

Something like this should work:

var patt = new RegExp(/^[0-9]+$/, "ig");
share|improve this answer
function isUserIdValid(user_id) {
    var patt = new RegExp(/^[a-z0-9]+$/i);
    return patt.test(user_id);
}
share|improve this answer

You should declare testUserIds with var so that it's a local variable, not a global one.

function foo() {
  var testUserIds = ['id23425860', 
  'yulka_rdtska',
  'im?sel=2000000001',
  'im?sel=2000000002'];

  // rest of your code
}

Also to declare a regular expression you can wrap the expression with slashes which is cleaner, like so:

var patt = /[^a-z]/ig;

A bit off-topic, but I couldn't help pointing out.

share|improve this answer

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