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Let's say I have two lists of strings:

a = ['####/boo', '####/baa', '####/bee', '####/bii', '####/buu']

where #### represents 4-digit random number. And

b = ['boo', 'aaa', 'bii']

I need to know which string entry in list a contains any given entry in b. I was able to accomplish this by couple of nested loops and then using the in operator for checking the string contains the current entry in b. But, being relatively new to py, I'm almost positive this was not the most pythonic or elegant way to write it. So, is there such idiom to reduce my solution?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The following code gives you an array with the indexes of a where the part after the slash is an element from b.

a_sep = [x.split('/')[1] for x in a]
idxs = [i for i, x in enumerate(a_sep) if x in b]

To improve performance, make b a set instead of a list.

Demo:

>>> a = ['####/boo', '####/baa', '####/bee', '####/bii', '####/buu']
>>> b = ['boo', 'aaa', 'bii']
>>> a_sep = [x.split('/')[1] for x in a]
>>> idxs = [i for i, x in enumerate(a_sep) if x in b]
>>> idxs
[0, 3]
>>> [a[i] for i in idxs]
['####/boo', '####/bii']

If you prefer to get the elements directly instead of the indexes:

>>> a = ['####/boo', '####/baa', '####/bee', '####/bii', '####/buu']
>>> b = ['boo', 'aaa', 'bii']
>>> [x for x in a if x.split('/')[1] in b]
['####/boo', '####/bii']
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Heh, tyvm. I knew I was not being suffiently succinct and pythonic when I had the nested loop declaration and comparison. –  rdodev May 7 '12 at 20:38
    
I've been thinking about the (anti)pythonic in operator. Excuse me if I'm off base here, but isn't one of py's tenets to avoid confusion and ambiguity? Why use the same operator for list comprehension and strings as a way to accomplishing "string a contains b as a substring" –  rdodev May 8 '12 at 17:46
    
I think with the context it's pretty obvious if it's an iteration or a containment check. –  ThiefMaster May 8 '12 at 17:57
    
Imagine you didn't know the contents or nature of a and b and that we didn't need the split that statement could read [x for x in a if x in b] I don't know, but it feels odd to me :) –  rdodev May 8 '12 at 18:03

ThiefMaster's answer is good, and mine will be quite similar, but if you don't need to know the indexes, you can take a shortcut:

>>> a = ['####/boo', '####/baa', '####/bee', '####/bii', '####/buu']
>>> b = ['boo', 'aaa', 'bii']
>>> [x for x in a if x.split('/')[1] in b]
['####/boo', '####/bii']

Again, if b is a set, that will improve performance for large numbers of elements.

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Indeed, and not-so-small numbers of elements as well. –  user1277476 May 7 '12 at 22:10
import random
a=[str(random.randint(1000,9999))+'/'+e for e in ['boo','baa','bee','bii','buu']]

b = ['boo', 'aaa', 'bii']

c=[x.split('/')[-1] for x in a if x.split('/')[-1] in b]

print c

prints:

['boo', 'bii']

Or, if you want the entire entry:

print [x for x in a if x.split('/')[-1] in b]

prints:

['3768/boo', '9110/bii']
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>>> [i for i in a for j in b if j in i]
['####/boo', '####/bii']

This should do what you want, elegant and pythonic.

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1  
That doesn't seem to be terribly expressive or explicit. –  rdodev May 7 '12 at 20:41
    
Double nested for loop plus a conditional in a list comprehension? Not very readable. –  Daenyth May 7 '12 at 20:44
    
Well, the way i read it is "A list containing i for i in a and j in b if i contains j". Just seems to make sense. But i guess i am a minority on the readability of this. –  tapan May 7 '12 at 20:46
    
I think it's readable enough if better variable names are used. However, in isn't technically exactly the right test. –  recursive May 7 '12 at 21:29

As other answers have indicated, you can use set operations to make this faster. Here's a way to do this:

>>> a_dict = dict((item.split('/')[1], item) for item in a)
>>> common = set(a_dict) & set(b)
>>> [a_dict[i] for i in common]
['####/boo', '####/bii']
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This misses some if there are duplicate elements after the slashes in a. –  recursive May 7 '12 at 21:30

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