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I discovered an issue with Magento routing logic and I would like to see if anyone can confirm this.

Magento stacks routers admin, standard, then default and processes them one at a time. Magento gets the current module name based on the URL (see Mage_Core_Controller_Varien_Router_Standard::match()), then checks if the module should be handled by this router, based on a match to a frontName in the Magento config. If a match is found, it routes it. If not, it continues to the next router.

Config excerpt:

    <admin>
        <routers>
            <myroute>
                <use>admin</use>
                <args>
                    <module>MyNamespace_MyModule</module>
                    <frontName>myroute</frontName>
                </args>
            </myroute>
        </routers>
    </admin>
    <frontend>
        <routers>
            <myroute>
                <use>admin</use>
                <args>
                    <module>MyNamespace_MyModule</module>
                    <frontName>myroute</frontName>
                </args>
            </myroute>
        </routers>
    </frontend>
    

This means that if you use the same name for your frontend router as your admin router, the admin router will always be matched first, even on frontend pages. Your frontend page will now route as is if were an admin page, using the admin base_url, which may be different from your store's URL causing a broken redirect.

Note that this issue is not apparent in Magento instances where the admin base URL is the same as the frontend base URL.

Can anyone confirm that my assesment of the router logic is correct here?

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I can't speak to your specific issue (I'm not sure I follow it entirely) but routing in Magento has started to gel around the idea of 1. Using custom frontname for frontend modules ; 2. Using the frontname "admin" for admin modules, and using the "modules" tag to add your controllers to the controllers the admin router will look for. If you break away from this pattern you're going to run into pain. –  Alan Storm May 7 '12 at 23:34
    
I found this issue in a third party module. It used the same frontname for the frontend and the admin areas. This seems like a reasonable thing to expect to work, the difference being the "admin" string in the URL which loads the admin store. The issue was that the frontend page ended up being loaded by the admin router, causing it to use the admin base URL which was different from the frontend base URL. Both routers appear to work as expected based on the config except for this naming conflict. –  kirkmadera May 9 '12 at 20:49
1  
Looking into this further I realize that the module wasn't working like I had thought. It was setting up its own frontname completely outside of admin. The admin looked the same because the module's controllers extended the Mage_Adminhtml_Controller_Action, whose preDispatch forces the design to the admin design. You're right in that all admin controllers should flow through the "admin" frontname using the "modules" node to override. This third party module is set up incorrectly. Still, not obvious behavior from Magento –  kirkmadera May 9 '12 at 21:30
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3 Answers

You may want to look over Varien/Router/Standard.php as well in particular:

/**
 * checking if this admin if yes then we don't use this router
 *
 * @return bool
 */
protected function _beforeModuleMatch()
{
    if (Mage::app()->getStore()->isAdmin()) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

And this is called within the method match(Zend_Controller_Request_Http $request) as well as collectRoutes($configArea, $useRouterName) as $useRouterName will sometimes return admin and will also return standard for frontend requests. The assumption sounds correct as it all depends on how magento builds and stacks the _routes and _modules private array in this same class: Mage_Core_Controller_Varien_Router_Standard.

I believe in this case you would want to specify the <use> node as standard for frontend and admin for admin, or rewrite the controller action in the <global> node.

I think your best bet is to read over:

and/or step through the logic with X-debug.

Even Alan Storm in his article writes how the same routers used for frontend and backend shouldn't be the same.

So it looks like this method is here to ensure the Standard router object bails if, for some reason, the store model object thinks its in admin mode. Like the Standard/Admin router relationship, the store object is another one of those things that points to certain parts of the Magento development process being focused on the frontend application first, and then tacking on an admin console later and having to back-port changes.

The store object is a model that really only applies to the frontend/cart application. However, because so much code in Magento assumes the store object exists, it needs to be available to the admin console application. This, in turn, creates trouble at the router level, which is what leads to a check like this. Many layers of abstraction, no defined contracts between classes/modules, and the fear of refactoring created by the lack of tests will always lead to these sorts of situations.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is not a Magento bug, but is something to be aware of when writing modules or working with third party code. I have clarified the issue and resolution here. Essentially, the existing adminhtml route should always be used rather than creating new admin routes. This makes urls in the admin consistent and avoids conflicts. Thank you Alan and Jared for helping me understand Magento routing better.

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Just to throw my 2 cents into this; I certainly noticed this issue tonight! I'm building a custom module and my config.xml routers are defined like so:

<admin>
    <routers>
        <namespace_module>
            <use>admin</use>
            <args>
                <module>Namespace_Module</module>
                <frontName>namespace_module</frontName>
            </args>
        </namespace_module>
    </routers>
</admin>
<frontend>
    <routers>
        <namespace_module>
            <use>standard</use>
            <args>
                <module>Namespace_Module</module>
                <frontName>namespace_module</frontName>
            </args>
        </namespace_module>
    </routers>
</frontend>

I was getting a 404 error on the frontend while the backend routers worked just fine. I changed the frontend name and voila:

<admin>
    <routers>
        <namespace_module>
            <use>admin</use>
            <args>
                <module>Namespace_Module</module>
                <frontName>namespace_module</frontName>
            </args>
        </namespace_module>
    </routers>
</admin>
<frontend>
    <routers>
        <namespace_module>
            <use>standard</use>
            <args>
                <module>Namespace_Module</module>
                <frontName>namespace_module_front</frontName>
            </args>
        </namespace_module>
    </routers>
</frontend>

Makes sense to use a unique name I guess!

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