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If I have a dictionary defined as users = {}, and lets say I have some data in that dictionary, how could I search through the dictionary, and do nothing if my search string matches a string in my dictionary.

for socket.user in MyServer.users:
    if ((MyServer.users.has_key(socket.user)) == false):
        MyServer.users[user].send(socket.message)

So here is searches the users dictionary, and finds that it is present, so it should do nothing. I know my code is wrong, but what could I change on the second line?

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4 Answers 4

How could I search through the dictionary, and do nothing if my search string matches a string in my dictionary.

if socket.user in MyServer.users: # search if key is in dictionary
   pass # do nothing
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Um... if a user shows up in the for/in loop, isn't the not in test guaranteed to be false? –  Daniel Pryden May 7 '12 at 20:43
    
@Daniel yes it is –  log0 May 7 '12 at 20:44
users = {} # defines a set, instead use users = dict() to create empty dictionary

users = {"A": 0, "B": 1, "C": 2}

key = "B"
value = "2"

if key in users.keys(): print("users contains key", key)
if value in users.values(): print("users contains value", value)
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1  
Instead of if key in users.keys(), you can just use if key in users -- it means the same thing. –  Daniel Pryden May 7 '12 at 20:48
1  
{} does not define a set, it's always a dictionary. (Even in Python 3 where you can use {...} for set literals.) –  kindall May 7 '12 at 20:58
    
Oh, yes, i confused, sorry –  atomAltera May 7 '12 at 21:01
    
FWIW, Python 2.7 also understands set literals. 2.6 does not. –  user1277476 May 7 '12 at 22:05

In python, you can use the pass keyword to essentially 'do nothing'.

for socket.user in MyServer.users:
    if MyServer.users.has_key(socket.user) == False:
        pass

However the more proper way would be to write your code in a manner that does what you WANT it to do; not doing what you don't NEED it to do.

for socket.user in MyServer.users:
    if MyServer.users.has_key(socket.user) == True:
        MyServer.users[user].send(socket.message)
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2  
Assuming MyServer.users is a normal Python dictionary, the for/if combination is wasteful, and a simple in (or not in) test would be much much faster. –  Daniel Pryden May 7 '12 at 20:44
    
@DanielPryden You are correct; an in/not in would be quicker than the method the question asker portrayed. –  PenguinCoder May 7 '12 at 20:53

Am I missing something, or is this what you are looking for:

if socket.user in MyServer.users:
    # Send a message if it's a valid user
    MyServer.users[user].send(socket.message)
else:
    # Do nothing if it isn't
    pass
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Unneeded else statement though with the singular command of pass. –  PenguinCoder May 7 '12 at 20:54
    
@PenguinCoder: Indeed. I only added it to make the flow clear to the OP. –  Daniel Pryden May 7 '12 at 20:55

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