Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there way to override return types in C#? If so how, and if not why and what is a recommended way of doing it?

My case is that I have an interface with an abstract base class and descendants of that. I would like to do this (ok not really, but as an example!) :

public interface Animal
{
   Poo Excrement { get; }
}

public class AnimalBase
{
   public virtual Poo Excrement { get { return new Poo(); } }
}

public class Dog
{
  // No override, just return normal poo like normal animal
}

public class Cat
{
  public override RadioactivePoo Excrement { get { return new RadioActivePoo(); } }
}

RadioactivePoo of course inherits from Poo.

My reason for wanting this is so that those who use Cat objects could use the Excrement property without having to cast the Poo into RadioactivePoo while for example the Cat could still be part of an Animal list where users may not necessarily be aware or care about their radioactive poo. Hope that made sense...

As far as I can see the compiler doesn't allow this at least. So I guess it is impossible. But what would you recommend as a solution to this?

share|improve this question
2  
What about generics? Wouldn't they help? –  Arnis L. Jun 26 '09 at 12:31
2  
Shouldn't Cat.Excrement() just return and instance of RadioActivePoo as Poo? You have a common interface, use it. (And thanks for the hysterical example.) –  hometoast Jun 26 '09 at 12:35
1  
I, too, want to say thanks for the example: @goodgai below is suggesting to create abstract Poo - I wonder how I could explain this to a non-programmer... –  Paolo Tedesco Jun 26 '09 at 12:39
1  
@Konrad: Slightly unsure if I should just laugh at that brilliant comment, or if I should also ask if it in fact is a very horrible code smell there that should be pointed out (cause in that case I would like to know about it :p) –  Svish Jun 29 '09 at 8:50
    
I'm almost disappointed in myself with how funny I found these examples XD –  Gurgadurgen Jun 28 '14 at 15:22

11 Answers 11

up vote 34 down vote accepted

What about a generic base class?

public class Poo { }
public class RadioactivePoo : Poo { }

public class BaseAnimal<PooType> 
    where PooType : Poo, new() {
    PooType Excrement {
        get { return new PooType(); }
    }
}

public class Dog : BaseAnimal<Poo> { }
public class Cat : BaseAnimal<RadioactivePoo> { }

EDIT: A new solution, using extension methods and a marker interface...

public class Poo { }
public class RadioactivePoo : Poo { }

// just a marker interface, to get the poo type
public interface IPooProvider<PooType> { }

// Extension method to get the correct type of excrement
public static class IPooProviderExtension {
    public static PooType StronglyTypedExcrement<PooType>(
        this IPooProvider<PooType> iPooProvider) 
        where PooType : Poo {
        BaseAnimal animal = iPooProvider as BaseAnimal;
        if (null == animal) {
            throw new InvalidArgumentException("iPooProvider must be a BaseAnimal.");
        }
        return (PooType)animal.Excrement;
    }
}

public class BaseAnimal {
    public virtual Poo Excrement {
        get { return new Poo(); }
    }
}

public class Dog : BaseAnimal, IPooProvider<Poo> { }

public class Cat : BaseAnimal, IPooProvider<RadioactivePoo> {
    public override Poo Excrement {
        get { return new RadioactivePoo(); }
    }
}

class Program { 
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        Dog dog = new Dog();
        Poo dogPoo = dog.Excrement;

        Cat cat = new Cat();
        RadioactivePoo catPoo = cat.StronglyTypedExcrement();
    }
}

This way Dog and Cat both inherit from Animal (as remarked in the comments, my first solution did not preserve the inheritance).
It's necessary to mark explicitly the classes with the marker interface, which is painful, but maybe this could give you some ideas...

SECOND EDIT @Svish: I modified the code to show explitly that the extension method is not enforcing in any way the fact that iPooProvider inherits from BaseAnimal. What do you mean by "even more strongly-typed"?

share|improve this answer
    
That seems like an excellent solution. –  mbillard Jun 26 '09 at 12:37
    
Was just thinking the same thing. –  Doctor Jones Jun 26 '09 at 12:40
5  
Dont you loose out on pollymorphism between Dog and Cat? –  almog.ori Jun 26 '09 at 12:51
    
What if there were other types you would like to override as well? You could technically end up with a whole bunch of type arguments. Which I think I might have found annoying... but yes, this is a solution. –  Svish Jun 26 '09 at 12:52
    
@Svish: I imagine once that happens, it's time to use a dependency injection framework. –  Brian Jun 26 '09 at 13:04

This is called return type covariance and is not supported in C# or .NET in general, despite some people's wishes.

What I would do is keep the same signature but add an additional ENSURE clause to the derived class in which I ensure that this one returns a RadioActivePoo. So, in short, I'd do via design by contract what I can't do via syntax.

Others prefer to fake it instead. It's ok, I guess, but I tend to economize "infrastructure" lines of code. If the semantics of the code are clear enough, I'm happy, and design by contract lets me achieve that, although it is not a compile time mechanism.

The same for generics, which other answers suggest. I would use them for a better reason than just returning radioactive poo - but that's just me.

share|improve this answer
    
What is the ENSURE clause? How would that work? Is it an attribute in .Net? –  Svish Jun 26 '09 at 12:53
1  
In .Net and before seeing .Net 4.0's Code Contracts, I write ENSURE(x) clauses as simply "Debug.Assert(x)". For further references see for example archive.eiffel.com/doc/manuals/technology/contract/page.html or Object Oriented Software Construction, 2nd Edition, by Bertrand Meyer (1994) chapter 11. –  Daniel Daranas Jun 26 '09 at 12:56
5  
"I would use them for a better reason than just returning radioactive poo - but that's just me" belongs in my list of favorite own quotes :) –  Daniel Daranas Feb 20 '10 at 11:06

There is also this option (explicit interface-implementation)

public class Cat:Animal
{
  Poo Animal.Excrement { get { return Excrement; } }
  public RadioactivePoo Excrement { get { return new RadioactivePoo(); } }
}

You lose the ability to use the base-class to implement Cat, but on the plus-side, you keep the polymorphism between Cat and Dog.

But I doubt the added complexity is worth it.

share|improve this answer

Why not define a protected virtual method that creates the 'Excrement' and keep the public property that returns the 'Excrement' non virtual. Then derived classes can override the return type of the base class.

In the following example, I make 'Excrement' non-virtual but provide the property ExcrementImpl to allow derived classes to provide the proper 'Poo'. Derived types can then override the return type of 'Excrement' by hiding the base class implementation.

E.x.:

namepace ConsoleApplication8

{
public class Poo { }

public class RadioactivePoo : Poo { }

public interface Animal
{
    Poo Excrement { get; }
}

public class AnimalBase
{
    public Poo Excrement { get { return ExcrementImpl; } }

    protected virtual Poo ExcrementImpl
    {
        get { return new Poo(); }
    }
}

public class Dog : AnimalBase
{
    // No override, just return normal poo like normal animal
}

public class Cat : AnimalBase
{
    protected override Poo ExcrementImpl
    {
        get { return new RadioactivePoo(); }
    }

    public new RadioactivePoo Excrement { get { return (RadioactivePoo)ExcrementImpl; } }
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
the example made this so much harder to understand. but great code! –  rposky Feb 17 '12 at 7:55

I know there are a lot of solutions for this problem already but I think I've come up with one that fixes the issues I had with the existing solutions.

I wasn't happy with the some of the existing solutions for the following reasons:

  • Paolo Tedesco's first solution: Cat and Dog do not have a common base class.
  • Paolo Tedesco's second solution: It is a bit complicated and hard to read.
  • Daniel Daranas's solution: This works but it would clutter up your code with a lot of unnecessary casting and Debug.Assert() statements.
  • hjb417's solutions: This solution doesn't let you keep your logic in a base class. The logic is pretty trivial in this example (calling a constructor) but in a real world example it wouldn't be.

My Solution

This solution should overcome all of the issues I mentioned above by using both generics and method hiding.

public class Poo { }
public class RadioactivePoo : Poo { }

interface IAnimal
{
    Poo Excrement { get; }
}

public class BaseAnimal<PooType> : IAnimal
    where PooType : Poo, new()
{
    Poo IAnimal.Excrement { get { return (Poo)this.Excrement; } }

    public PooType Excrement
    {
        get { return new PooType(); }
    }
}

public class Dog : BaseAnimal<Poo> { }
public class Cat : BaseAnimal<RadioactivePoo> { }

With this solution you don't need to override anything in Dog OR Cat! How cool is that? Here is some sample usage:

Cat bruce = new Cat();
IAnimal bruceAsAnimal = bruce as IAnimal;
Console.WriteLine(bruce.Excrement.ToString());
Console.WriteLine(bruceAsAnimal.Excrement.ToString());

This will output: "RadioactivePoo" twice which shows that polymorphism has not been broken.

Further Reading

  • Explicit Interface Implementation
  • new Modifier. I didn't use it in this simplified solution but you may need it in a more complicated solution. For example if you wanted to create an interface for BaseAnimal then you would need to use it in your decleration of "PooType Excrement".
  • out Generic Modifier (Covariance). Again I didn't use it in this solution but if you wanted to do something like return MyType<Poo> from IAnimal and return MyType<PooType> from BaseAnimal then you would need to use it to be able to cast between the two.
share|improve this answer
    
Dude, this may be super cool. I don't have time to analyze further at the moment, but it looks like you may have got it, and if you did crack this, high five and thanks for sharing. Unfortunately this 'poo' and 'excrement' business is a big distraction. –  Nicholas Petersen May 8 '13 at 15:40
    
I think I found a solution for a related problem, where a method has to return the inherited type -- i.e. a method in 'Dog' that was inherited from 'Animal' nonetheless returns Dog (this), not Animal. Its done with extension methods, I might share here when I get to it. –  Nicholas Petersen May 8 '13 at 15:42

Correct me if im wrong but isnt the whole point of pollymorphism to be able to return RadioActivePoo if it inherits from Poo, the contract would be the same as the abstract class but just return RadioActivePoo()

share|improve this answer
1  
You are perfectly right, but he wants to avoid the extra cast and some stronger-typing, which is mostly what generics are for... –  Paolo Tedesco Jun 26 '09 at 12:40

Try this:

namespace ClassLibrary1
{
    public interface Animal
    {   
        Poo Excrement { get; }
    }

    public class Poo
    {
    }

    public class RadioactivePoo
    {
    }

    public class AnimalBase<T>
    {   
        public virtual T Excrement
        { 
            get { return default(T); } 
        }
    }


    public class Dog : AnimalBase<Poo>
    {  
        // No override, just return normal poo like normal animal
    }

    public class Cat : AnimalBase<RadioactivePoo>
    {  
        public override RadioactivePoo Excrement 
        {
            get { return new RadioactivePoo(); } 
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What is the point of the Animal interface here? Nothing inherits from it. –  rob Dec 5 '12 at 4:43

I think I've found a way that doesn't depend on generics or extension methods, but rather method hiding. It can break polymorphism, however, so be especially careful if you further inherit from Cat.

I hope this post could still help somebody, despite being 8 months late.

public interface Animal
{
    Poo Excrement { get; }
}

public class Poo
{
}

public class RadioActivePoo : Poo
{
}

public class AnimalBase : Animal
{
    public virtual Poo Excrement { get { return new Poo(); } }
}

public class Dog : AnimalBase
{
    // No override, just return normal poo like normal animal
}

public class CatBase : AnimalBase
{
    public override Poo Excrement { get { return new RadioActivePoo(); } }
}

public class Cat : CatBase
{
    public new RadioActivePoo Excrement { get { return (RadioActivePoo) base.Excrement; } }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Aack, never mind. I didn't realize hjb417 already posted a similar solution. At least mine doesn't require modifying the base class. –  Cybis Feb 20 '10 at 2:46
    
your "solution" DOES break polymorphism, so it is not really a solution. On the other hand hjb solution is real solution, and pretty smart IMHO. –  greenoldman May 26 '11 at 7:35

FYI. This is implemented quite easily in Scala.

trait Path

trait Resource
{
    def copyTo(p: Path): Resource
}
class File extends Resource
{
    override def copyTo(p: Path): File = new File
    override def toString = "File"
}
class Directory extends Resource
{
    override def copyTo(p: Path): Directory = new Directory
    override def toString = "Directory"
}

val test: Resource = new Directory()
test.copyTo(null)

Here is a live example you can play with: http://www.scalakata.com/50d0d6e7e4b0a825d655e832

share|improve this answer

It might help if RadioactivePoo is derived from poo and then use generics.

share|improve this answer

I believe your answer is called covariance.

class Program
{
    public class Poo
    {
        public virtual string Name { get{ return "Poo"; } }
    }

    public class RadioactivePoo : Poo
    {
        public override string Name { get { return "RadioactivePoo"; } }
        public string DecayPeriod { get { return "Long time"; } }
    }

    public interface IAnimal<out T> where T : Poo
    {
        T Excrement { get; }
    }

    public class Animal<T>:IAnimal<T> where T : Poo 
    {
        public T Excrement { get { return _excrement ?? (_excrement = (T) Activator.CreateInstance(typeof (T), new object[] {})); } } 
        private T _excrement;
    }

    public class Dog : Animal<Poo>{}
    public class Cat : Animal<RadioactivePoo>{}

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var dog = new Dog();
        var cat = new Cat();

        IAnimal<Poo> animal1 = dog;
        IAnimal<Poo> animal2 = cat;

        Poo dogPoo = dog.Excrement;
        //RadioactivePoo dogPoo2 = dog.Excrement; // Error, dog poo is not RadioactivePoo.

        Poo catPoo = cat.Excrement;
        RadioactivePoo catPoo2 = cat.Excrement;

        Poo animal1Poo = animal1.Excrement;
        Poo animal2Poo = animal2.Excrement;
        //RadioactivePoo animal2RadioactivePoo = animal2.Excrement; // Error, IAnimal<Poo> reference do not know better.


        Console.WriteLine("Dog poo name: {0}",dogPoo.Name);
        Console.WriteLine("Cat poo name: {0}, decay period: {1}" ,catPoo.Name, catPoo2.DecayPeriod);
        Console.WriteLine("Press any key");

        var key = Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.