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I have got a "class" (function) in js named Foo that create objects. As it is used very frequently, I want it to avoid requiring the new keywoard being used when new instances of it are to be created: Foo(something); instead of new Foo(something);.

I got this to work in Firefox with:

function Foo(arg) {
    if (this instanceof Window)
        return new Foo(arg);

    //Object construction here.
    this.bar = "Hello " + arg;
}

Now I can create instances of Foo just by calling it as a function.

console.log(Foo("World").bar); //Output "Hello World" in console.

While this is working in FF, it does not in Chrome and I did not dare testing IE yet.

The problem in chrome is that window is really of type DOMWindow in chrome

Uncaught ReferenceError: Window is not defined

and this instanceof DOMWindow does not work in chrome because for some reason it gives:

ReferenceError: DOMWindow is not defined

I have also tried using !(this instanceof Foo) and typeof this always seems to give "object".

How can I reliably detect if the new keyword was omitted when calling Foo on all browsers?

Update: !(this instanceof Foo) does work, I just had a stray return this in my real Foo function.

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using !(this instanceof Foo) works for me (Chrome, Safari, Firefox on Mac). That code: function Foo() { console.log(this instanceof Foo) } will log false for the execution of Foo() and true for new Foo() in the browsers above. –  ZER0 May 7 '12 at 21:05
    
@ZER0 yea, i just realised that I have had a stray return this in my function that prevent it from working. –  d_inevitable May 7 '12 at 21:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Testing this being an instanceof Foo works in Chrome 20, FF 12, and IE 8, and should work fine:

function Foo(arg) {
    if (!(this instanceof Foo)) return new Foo(arg);

    //Object construction here.
    this.bar = "Hello " + arg;
}

var foo = Foo('World');
var baz = new Foo('Baz');

console.log(foo.bar);
console.log(baz.bar);

As a fiddle : http://jsfiddle.net/YSEFK/

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That didn't work for me before. But now I did figure out why. I had a stray return this at the end of the function. This ofc is a much neater way. –  d_inevitable May 7 '12 at 21:04

I've not tested, but perhaps something like this would work?

var realWindow = this;

function Foo(arg) {
    if (this === realWindow)
        return new Foo(arg);

    //Object construction here.
    this.bar = "Hello " + arg;
}

You'll want to make sure realWindow is declared outside of any scopes to avoid possible clashes with this, of course.

In general though, although this is clever, I wouldn't recommend doing it just to save a few characters of typing. It obfuscates the code for future developers and is generally not good practice.

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1  
It depends on what you want. For frameworks like jQuery this is extremely comfortable - imagine if you had to use new $() instead of $() all the time. –  ThiefMaster May 7 '12 at 20:59
    
@ThiefMaster, you're correct, of course. That's why I said "in general". There's almost always a case when breaking a rule or a best practice is okay and even recommended. :) –  Elliot Bonneville May 7 '12 at 21:00
    
Yup, this works, thanks a lot. as ThiefMaster has suggested, it does make sense in some cases. –  d_inevitable May 7 '12 at 21:01
1  
Can I ask why this was downvoted? My answer is perfectly valid. –  Elliot Bonneville May 7 '12 at 21:04

What about invert the condition?

function Foo(arg) {
    if (!(this instanceof Foo))
        return new Foo(arg);

    //Object construction here.
    this.bar = "Hello " + arg;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works, but you have to repeat the name of the function. Of course you could use arguments.callee, but that won't work in ES strict mode. –  ThiefMaster May 7 '12 at 21:24
    
I just replied to the OP needs. Personally speaking, I prefer to use Object.create and then apply the constructor on the new instance. In that way you don't need to repeat yourself, and you can also create an utility function that do the job for you. –  ZER0 May 7 '12 at 21:44

The way you should be doing this is by checking the current instance against its own type:

function Foo(...args...) {
    if (!(this instanceof Foo)) {
        return new Foo(...args...);
    }
    ...do stuff...
}

It saves from trying to check against the global object, and works in almost any context (although might not make sense in others):

var a = {};
Foo.call(a);

What should this return? in my example it will return a new Foo instance, although you might not want it to create a new Foo.

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