Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm making a game and in it is a computer controlled gun turret. The gun turret can rotate 360 degrees.

It uses trig to find out the angle it needs to aim the gun (objdeg) and the current angle of the gun is stored in (gundeg)

the following code rotates the gun at a set speed

if (objdeg > gundeg)
{
    gundeg++;
}
if (objdeg < gundeg)
{
    gundeg--;
}

The problem is that if there is an object at 10 degrees, the gun rotates, shoots and destroys it, if another target appears at 320 degrees, the gun will rotate 310 degrees anticlockwise instead of just rotating 60 degrees clockwise to hit it.

How can I fix my code so it won't act stupidly?

share|improve this question
6  
I'm slightly bemused by seeing 10 upvotes and 3 favourites for this one.... is there a subtly to this question that I'm missing? –  skaffman Jun 26 '09 at 14:00
    
I think it's a fun problem to solve and has gotten a lot of interest, a lot of wrong answers a lot of right answers. –  JoshBerke Jun 26 '09 at 14:11
1  
Well Josh's solution was quite nicely done as well, only if i had two slots for accepted answers –  Verroq Jun 26 '09 at 14:15

13 Answers 13

up vote 19 down vote accepted

If you need to rotate more than 180 degrees in one direction to aim the turret, then it would be quicker to rotate the other direction.

I would just check for this and then rotate in the appropriate direction

if (objdeg != gundeg)
{
    if ((gundeg - objdeg) > 180)
       gundeg++;
    else
       gundeg--;
}

EDIT: New Solution

I have refined my solution based on the feedback in the comments. This determines whether the target is to the 'left or right' of the turret and decides which way to turn. It then inverts this direction if the target is more than 180 degrees away.

if (objdeg != gundeg)
{
  int change = 0;
  int diff = gundeg - objdeg;
  if (diff < 0)
     change = 1;
  else
     change = -1;

  if (Math.Abs(diff) > 180)
     change = 0 - change;

  gundeg += change;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
one slight oversight, this makes the turret get stuck on 350 something degress, and unable to hit anything from 0 to 180 degress. –  Verroq Jun 26 '09 at 13:24
    
This assumes objdeg and gundeg are both integers. If the two are not equal, the turret will ALWAYS move. How are your angles being calculated? –  Kirschstein Jun 26 '09 at 13:31
1  
needs a gundeg % 360 then –  wds Jun 26 '09 at 13:32
    
no... When gundeg is equal to 359 degress, objdeg is equal to 10 degress if((359-10) > 180) -> yes gundeg++ -> gundeg now equal to 360 modulus - > gundeg now equal to 0 if((0-10)>180)) -> NO gundeg -1 -> gundeg now equal to -1 modulus -> gundeg now equal to 359 rinse and repeat –  Verroq Jun 26 '09 at 13:38
1  
Working solution. May I say Josh's one is also prefect, stackoverflow.com/questions/1048945/… but I cant select two as accepted answers –  Verroq Jun 26 '09 at 14:10

You can avoid division (and mod) entirely if you represent your angles in something referred to as 'BAMS', which stands for Binary Angle Measurement System. The idea is that if you store your angles in an N bit integer, you use the entire range of that integer to represent the angle. That way, there's no need to worry about overflow past 360, because the natural modulo-2^N properties of your representation take care of it for you.

For example, lets say you use 8 bits. This cuts your circle into 256 possible orientations. (You may choose more bits, but 8 is convenient for the example's sake). Let 0x00 stand for 0 degrees, 0x40 means 90 degrees, 0x80 is 180 degrees, and 0xC0 is 270 degrees. Don't worry about the 'sign' bit, again, BAMS is a natural for angles. If you interpret 0xC0 as 'unsigned' and scaled to 360/256 degrees per count, your angle is (+192)(360/256) = +270; but if you interpret 0xC0 as 'signed', your angle is (-64)(360/256)= -90. Notice that -90 and +270 mean the same thing in angular terms.

If you want to apply trig functions to your BAMS angles, you can pre-compute tables. There are tricks to smallen the tables but you can see that the tables aren't all that large. To store an entire sine and cosine table of double precision values for 8-bit BAMS doesn't take more than 4K of memory, chicken feed in today's environment.

Since you mention using this in a game, you probably could get away with 8-bit or 10-bit representations. Any time you add or subtract angles, you can force the result into N bits using a logical AND operation, e.g., angle &= 0x00FF for 8 bits.

FORGOT THE BEST PART (edit)

The turn-right vs turn-left problem is easily solved in a BAMS system. Just take the difference, and make sure to only keep the N meaningful bits. Interpreting the MSB as a sign bit indicates which way you should turn. If the difference is negative, turn the opposite way by the abs() of the difference.

This ugly little C program demonstrates. Try giving it input like 20 10 and 20 30 at first. Then try to fool it by wrapping around the zero point. Give it 20 -10, it will turn left. Give it 20 350, it still turns left. Note that since it's done in 8 bits, that 181 is indistinguishable from 180, so don't be surprised if you feed it 20 201 and it turns right instead of left - in the resolution afforded by eight bits, turning left and turning right in this case are the same. Put in 20 205 and it will go the shorter way.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

#define TOBAMS(x)    (((x)/360.0) * 256)
#define TODEGS(b)    (((b)/256.0) * 360)

int main(void)
{
    double a1, a2;     // "real" angles
    int b1, b2, b3;    // BAMS angles


    // get some input
    printf("Start Angle ? ");
    scanf("%lf", &a1);

    printf("Goal Angle ? ");
    scanf("%lf", &a2);

    b1 = TOBAMS(a1);
    b2 = TOBAMS(a2);

    // difference increases with increasing goal angle
    // difference decreases with increasing start angle
    b3 = b2 - b1;
    b3 &= 0xff;

    printf("Start at %7.2lf deg and go to %7.2lf deg\n", a1, a2);
    printf("BAMS   are 0x%02X and 0x%02X\n", b1, b2);
    printf("BAMS diff is 0x%02X\n", b3);

    // check what would be the 'sign bit' of the difference
    // negative (msb set) means turn one way, positive the other
    if( b3 & 0x80 )
    {
        // difference is negative; negate to recover the
        // DISTANCE to move, since the negative-ness just
        // indicates direction.

        // cheap 2's complement on an N-bit value:
        // invert, increment, trim
        b3 ^= -1;       // XOR -1 inverts all the bits
        b3 += 1;        // "add 1 to x" :P
        b3 &= 0xFF;     // retain only N bits

        // difference is already positive, can just use it
        printf("Turn left %lf degrees\n", TODEGS(b3));
        printf("Turn left %d counts\n", b3);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("Turn right %lf degrees\n", TODEGS(b3));
        printf("Turn right %d counts\n", b3);
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 because this is such an refreshing approach! –  Marc Jun 26 '09 at 13:59
1  
Premature optimisation is the root of all evil. –  finnw Jun 26 '09 at 14:02
3  
@finnw - I do not disagree about premature optimization. Yes, cutting out division may smack of optimization, but the point of BAMS isn't so much optimization, as it is to leverage the natural modulo-2^N properties of integers. –  JustJeff Jun 26 '09 at 14:16
1  
more on 'optimization' - actually, he did say 'game'. About half of game programming is optimizing that 20% of the code that takes 80% of the CPU. I would suspect 'aiming the gun' is going to be near that 20% =) –  JustJeff Jun 26 '09 at 14:19
    
Is there a reference for where this comes from? A paper thrown up by googling indicates it's from ship tactical systems. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 27 '09 at 11:42

To Normalised to [0,360):

(I.e. a half open range)

Use the modulus operator to perform "get division remainder":

361 % 360

will be 1.

In C/C++/... style languages this would be

gundeg %= 360

Note (thanks to a comment): if gundeg is a floating point type you will need to either use a library function, in C/C++: fmod, or do it yourself (.NET):

double FMod(double a, double b) {
  return a - Math.floor(a / b) * b;
}

Which Way To Turn?

Which ever way is shorter (and if turn is 180°, then the answer is arbitrary), in C#, and assuming direction is measured anti-clockwise

TurnDirection WhichWayToTurn(double currentDirection, double targetDirection) {
  Debug.Assert(currentDirection >= 0.0 && currentDirection < 360.0
               && targetDirection >= 0.0 && targetDirection < 360.0);

  var diff = targetDirection - currentDirection ;
  if (Math.Abs(diff) <= FloatEpsilon) {
    return TurnDirection.None;
  } else if (diff > 0.0) {
    return TurnDirection.AntiClockwise;
  } else {
    return TurnDirection.Clockwise;
  }
}

NB. This requires testing.

Note use of assert to confirm pre-condition of normalised angles, and I use an assert because this is an internal function that should not be receiving unverified data. If this were a generally reusable function the argument check should throw an exception or return an error (depending on language).

Also note. to work out things like this there is nothing better than a pencil and paper (my initial version was wrong because I was mixing up using (-180,180] and [0,360).

share|improve this answer
7  
But how do you use this to determine which way to turn? –  JoshBerke Jun 26 '09 at 12:56
1  
Note that if you're using floating point angles (as most people do) you need to use a floating point modulus. In C/C++ this is the fmod() function, or in C# it's Math.IEEERemainder(). –  Ron Warholic Jun 26 '09 at 12:59
24  
This illustrates the worst of StackOverflow's fastest-gun-in-the-west problem, where a correct-looking answer gets voted higher than correct answers. The original question was about determining which way to turn (so it would involve checking whether x is smaller or 360-x, where x is the difference of the angles mod 360), but this answer is at 11 votes and rising despite not answering the question at all. –  ShreevatsaR Jun 26 '09 at 13:05
1  
just vote it down then... –  wds Jun 26 '09 at 13:17
7  
So you first answer with something that looks alright but isn't, getting quick upvotes, then read the correct answers, incorporate them in your post et voila, free rep. Brilliant! –  wds Jun 26 '09 at 13:34

I tend to favor a solution that

  • does not have lots of nested if statements
  • does not assume that either of the two angles are in a particular range, e.g. [0, 360] or [-180, 180]
  • has a constant execution time

The cross product solution proposed by Krypes meets this criteria, however it is necessary to generate the vectors from the angles first. I believe that JustJeff's BAMS technique also satisfies this criteria. I'll offer another ...

As discussed on Why is modulus different in different programming languages? which refers to the excellent Wikipedia Article, there are many ways to perform the modulo operation. Common implementations round the quotient towards zero or negative infinity.

If however, you round to the nearest integer:

double ModNearestInt(double a, double b) {
    return a - b * round(a / b);
}

The has the nice property that the remainder returned is

  • always in the interval [-b/2, +b/2]
  • always the shortest distance to zero

So,

double angleToTarget = ModNearestInt(objdeg - gundeg, 360.0);

will be the smallest angle between objdeg and gundeg and the sign will indicate the direction.

share|improve this answer
    
that looked so cool i ran it through the ol' compiler and yes, it works! Also wanted to say, nice list of qualities there, glad to see that not everyone is crazy for nests of if-else! =) –  JustJeff Jun 27 '09 at 13:00

Just compare the following:

gundeg - objdeg
objdeg - gundeg 
gundeg - objdeg + 360
objdeg - gundeg + 360

and choose the one with minimum absolute value.

share|improve this answer
    
do it between the first and third in your list. then for that number check it's sign - that would be the direction to turn –  yairchu Jun 26 '09 at 15:00

Here's a workign C# sample, this will turn the right way. :

public class Rotater
{
    int _position;
    public Rotater()
    {

    }
    public int Position
    {
        get
        {
            return _position;
        }
        set            
        {
            if (value < 0)
            {
                _position = 360 + value;
            }
            else
            {
                _position = value;
            }
            _position %= 360;
        }
    }
    public bool RotateTowardsEx(int item)
    {
        if (item > Position)
        {
            if (item - Position < 180)
            {
                Position++;
            }
            else
            {
                Position--;
            }
            return false;
        }
        else if (Position > item)
        {
            if (Position - item < 180)
            {
                Position--;
            }
            else
            {
                Position++;
            }
            return false;
        }
        else
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
}

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {


        do
        {
            Rotater rot = new Rotater();
            Console.Write("Enter Starting Point: ");
            var startingPoint = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
            rot.Position = startingPoint;
            int turns = 0;

            Console.Write("Enter Item Point: ");
            var item = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
            while (!rot.RotateTowardsEx(item))
            {
                turns++;
            }
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} turns to go from {1} to {2}", turns, startingPoint, item));
        } while (Console.ReadLine() != "q");


    }

Credit to John Pirie for inspiration

Edit: I wasn't happy with my Position setter, so I cleaned it up

share|improve this answer
    
This also works perfect, except I cant seem to select both as accepted answers. –  Verroq Jun 26 '09 at 14:09

You need to decide whether to rotate left or right, based on which is the shorter distance. Then you'll need to take modulus:

if (objdeg > gundeg)
{
    if (objdeg - gundeg < 180)
    {
        gundeg++;
    }
    else
    {
        gundeg--;
    }
}
if (objdeg < gundeg)
{
    if (gundeg - objdeg < 180)
    {
        gundeg--;
    }
    else
    {
        gundeg++;
    }
}
if (gundeg < 0)
{
    gundeg += 360;
}
gundeg = gundeg % 360;
share|improve this answer
    
successfully shoots target at 10 degress, faces back of the gun to the target at 310 degress. –  Verroq Jun 26 '09 at 13:33
    
@Verroq: Edited to allow for gundeg declining to < 0. Don't really have facility to test, but I think that should do it. –  John Pirie Jun 26 '09 at 14:00

Actually, theres an easier way to approach this problem. Cross product of two vectors gives you a vector representing the normal (eg. perpendicular). As an artifact of this, given two vectors a, b, which lie on the xy-plane, a x b = c implies c = (0,0, +-1).

Sign of the z component of c (eg. whether it comes out of, or goes into the xy- plane) depends on whether its a left or right turn around z axis for a to be equal to b.

Vector3d turret Vector3d enemy

if turret.equals(enemy) return; Vector3d normal = turret.Cross(enemy); gundeg += normal.z > 0 ? 1 : -1; // counter clockwise = +ve

share|improve this answer

Try dividing by 180 using integer division and turning based on even/odd outcome?

749/180 = 4 So you turn clockwise by 29 degrees (749%180)

719/180 = 3 So you turn counterclockwise by 1 degree (180 - 719%180)

share|improve this answer

The problem is about finding the direction that will give the shortest distance.

However, subtraction can result in negative numbers and that needs to be accounted for.
If you are moving the gun one step at each check, I don't know when you will do the modulus.
And, if you want to move the gun in one step, you would just add/subtract the delta correctly.

To this end Kirschstein seems to be thinking nearest to me.
I am working with an integer in this simple psudo-code.

if (objdeg != gundeg)
{
    // we still need to move the gun
    delta = gundeg - objdeg
    if (delta > 0)
        if (unsigned(delta) > 180)
           gundeg++;
        else
           gundeg--;
    else // delta < 0
        if (unsigned(delta) > 180)
           gundeg--;        
        else
           gundeg++;

    if (gundeg == 360)
        gundeg = 0;
    else if (gundeg == -1)
        gundeg = 359;
}

Try to work this incrementally with gundeg=10 and objdeg=350 to see how the gundeg will be moved from 10 down to 0 and then 359 down to 350.

share|improve this answer

Here's how I implemented something similar in a game recently:

double gundeg;

// ...

double normalizeAngle(double angle)
{
    while (angle >= 180.0)
    {
        angle -= 360.0;
    }
    while (angle < -180.0)
    {
       angle += 360.0;
    }
    return angle;
}

double aimAt(double objAngle)
{
    double difference = normalizeAngle(objdeg - gundeg);
    gundeg = normalizeAngle(gundeg + signum(difference));
}

All angle variables are restricted to -180..+180, which makes this kind of calculation easier.

share|improve this answer

At the risk of bikeshedding, storing degrees as an integer rather than as its own class might be a case of "primitive obsession". If I recall correctly, the book "The pragmatic programmer" suggested creating a class for storing degrees and doing operations on them.

share|improve this answer

Here's the short-test pseudo code sample I can think of that answers the problem. It works in your domain of positive angles 0..359 and it handles the edge conditions first prior to handling the 'normal' ones.

if (objdeg >= 180 and gundeg < 180)
    gundeg = (gundeg + 359) % 360;
else if (objdeg < 180 and gundeg >= 180)
    gundeg = (gundeg + 1) % 360;
else if (objdeg > gundeg)
    gundeg = (gundeg + 1) % 360;
else if (objdeg < gundeg)
    gundeg = (gundeg + 359) % 360;
else
    shootitnow();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.