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When I use another object in the .net-Framework in C# I can save a lot of typing by using the using directive.

using FooCompany.Bar.Qux.Assembly.With.Ridiculous.Long.Namespace.I.Really.Mean.It;

...


  var blurb = new Thingamabob();

...

So is there a way in Powershell to do something similiar? I'm accessing a lot of .net objects and am not happy of having to type

 $blurb = new-object FooCompany.Bar.Qux.Assembly.With.Ridiculous.Long.Namespace.I.Really.Mean.It.Thingamabob;

all the time.

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Check out this blog post from a couple years ago: http://blogs.msdn.com/richardb/archive/2007/02/21/add-types-ps1-poor-man-s-using-for-powershell.aspx

Here is add-types.ps1, excerpted from that article:

param(
    [string] $assemblyName = $(throw 'assemblyName is required'),
    [object] $object
)

process {
    if ($_) {
        $object = $_
    }

    if (! $object) {
        throw 'must pass an -object parameter or pipe one in'
    }

    # load the required dll
    $assembly = [System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName($assemblyName)

    # add each type as a member property
    $assembly.GetTypes() | 
    where {$_.ispublic -and !$_.IsSubclassOf( [Exception] ) -and $_.name -notmatch "event"} | 
    foreach { 
        # avoid error messages in case it already exists
        if (! ($object | get-member $_.name)) {
            add-member noteproperty $_.name $_ -inputobject $object
        }
    }
}

And, to use it:

RICBERG470> $tfs | add-types "Microsoft.TeamFoundation.VersionControl.Client"
RICBERG470> $itemSpec = new-object $tfs.itemspec("$/foo", $tfs.RecursionType::none)

Basically what I do is crawl the assembly for nontrivial types, then write a "constructor" that uses Add-Member add them (in a structured way) to the objects I care about.

See also this followup post: http://richardberg.net/blog/?p=38

share|improve this answer
    
It seems that one needs to use the assembly name (e.g. mscorlib) instead of a type name (e.g. System.IO.Path). – Micha Wiedenmann Feb 11 at 8:58
    
If you don't have an object around to pass it to the function, you can create one using New-Object PSObject. – Micha Wiedenmann Feb 11 at 8:59

This windows powershell blog posting has an example of how to achieve this

share|improve this answer
    
While interesting, that blog entry discusses a lookalike for the using statement (which in C# disposes a disposable after use), not the using directive for using a namespace. – froh42 Jun 26 '09 at 13:00
    
That refers to the using statement (for IDisposable objects), not the using directive (for importing namespaces), as the OP wants. – Noldorin Jun 26 '09 at 13:03

There's really nothing at the namespace level like that. I often assign commonly used types to variables and then instantiate them:

$thingtype = [FooCompany.Bar.Qux.Assembly.With.Ridiculous.Long.Namespace.I.Really.Mean.It.Thingamabob];
$blurb = New-Object $thingtype.FullName

Probably not worth it if the type won't be used repeatedly, but I believe it's the best you can do.

share|improve this answer
    
I sometimes need to convert SecureStrings back to plain text. The following is useful: $ns = [System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal] then you can $ns::PtrToStringAuto($ns::SecureStringToBSTR($ss)). – Eld Mar 24 at 17:55

this is just a joke, joke...

$fullnames = New-Object ( [System.Collections.Generic.List``1].MakeGenericType( [String]) );

function using ( $name ) { 
foreach ( $type in [Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName($name).GetTypes() )
    {
        $fullnames.Add($type.fullname);
    }
}

function new ( $name ) {
    $fullname = $fullnames -like "*.$name";
    return , (New-Object $fullname[0]);
}

using System.Windows.Forms
using FooCompany.Bar.Qux.Assembly.With.Ridiculous.Long.Namespace.I.Really.Mean.It
$a = new button
$b = new Thingamabob
share|improve this answer
    
Can someone please explain the double ``1 in the type, I'm finding it hard to search on. – Pete Jun 12 '15 at 16:54
    
That would be the equivalent to the C# using statement, not the using directive. – Paulo Morgado Oct 1 '15 at 10:04
    
I like the way this looks. If you were to commit to it, this seems like a pretty elegant solution to me. PowerShell's flexibility in crafting a new syntax makes me very happy. – Programmer Paul Dec 4 '15 at 18:43
    
@ProgrammerPaul If you find that amusing, try out a functional language -- some of them implement try..catch as a library, including Haskell, and IIRC Clojure. – jpaugh Jan 18 at 21:25

Thanks everybody for your input. I've marked Richard Berg's contribution as an answer, because it most closely resembles what I'm looking for.

All your answers brought me on the track that seems most promising: In his blog post Keith Dahlby proposes a Get-Type commandlet that allows easy consutruction of types for generic methods.

I think there is no reason against exetending this to also search through a predefined path of assemblies for a type.

Disclaimer: I haven't built that -- yet ...

Here is how one could use it:

$path = (System.Collections.Generic, FooCompany.Bar.Qux.Assembly.With.Ridiculous.Long.Namespace.I.Really.Mean.It)

$type = get-type -Path $path List Thingamabob
$obj = new-object $type
$obj.GetType()

This would result in a nice generic List of Thingamabob. Of course I'd wrap up everthing sans the path definition in just another utility function. The extended get-type would include a step to resolve any given type agains the path.

share|improve this answer

Here's some code that works in PowerShell 2.0 to add type aliases. But the problem is that it is not scoped. With some extra work you could "un-import" the namespaces, but this should get you off to a good start.

##############################################################################
#.SYNOPSIS
# Add a type accelerator to the current session.
#
#.DESCRIPTION
# The Add-TypeAccelerator function allows you to add a simple type accelerator
# (like [regex]) for a longer type (like [System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex]).
#
#.PARAMETER Name
# The short form accelerator should be just the name you want to use (without
# square brackets).
#
#.PARAMETER Type
# The type you want the accelerator to accelerate.
#
#.PARAMETER Force
# Overwrites any existing type alias.
#
#.EXAMPLE
# Add-TypeAccelerator List "System.Collections.Generic.List``1"
# $MyList = New-Object List[String]
##############################################################################
function Add-TypeAccelerator {

    [CmdletBinding()]
    param(

        [Parameter(Position=1,Mandatory=$true,ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
        [String[]]$Name,

        [Parameter(Position=2,Mandatory=$true,ValueFromPipeline=$true)]
        [Type]$Type,

        [Parameter()]
        [Switch]$Force

    )

    process {

        $TypeAccelerators = [Type]::GetType('System.Management.Automation.TypeAccelerators')

        foreach ($a in $Name) {
            if ( $TypeAccelerators::Get.ContainsKey($a) ) {
                if ( $Force ) {
                    $TypeAccelerators::Remove($a) | Out-Null
                    $TypeAccelerators::Add($a,$Type)
                }
                elseif ( $Type -ne $TypeAccelerators::Get[$a] ) {
                    Write-Error "$a is already mapped to $($TypeAccelerators::Get[$a])"
                }
            }
            else {
                $TypeAccelerators::Add($a, $Type)
            }
        }

    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Josh, thanks I had not looked at extending the type accelerators, yet. This is very interesting, I think I'll play a bit around with it. – froh42 Nov 15 '09 at 21:49
    
It's handy but use it with caution. Nothing worse than writing a script that doesn't work on someone else's machine. For that reason I never put these accelerators in my profile. If anything, I'll put them at the top of a script that way it'll fail at the Add-TypeAccelerator right away. – Josh Nov 17 '09 at 2:49

If you just need to create an instance of your type, you can store the name of the long namespace in a string:

$st = "System.Text"
$sb = New-Object "$st.StringBuilder"

It's not as powerful as the using directive in C#, but at least it's very easy to use.

share|improve this answer

the best logical equivilent would be using the "Start-SPAssignment". see in details http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff607664(v=office.15).aspx

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I realize this is an old post, but I was looking for the same thing and came across this: http://weblogs.asp.net/adweigert/powershell-adding-the-using-statement

Edit: I suppose I should specify that it allows you to use the familiar syntax of...

using ($x = $y) { ... }
share|improve this answer
1  
That would be the equivalent to the C# using statement, not the using directive. – Paulo Morgado Oct 1 '15 at 10:05
    
Touche'. I misread the question. – haliphax Oct 5 '15 at 14:41

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