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Say that I have one constructor that takes an input and another that uses a default value. Both constructors then proceed to process this data in exactly the same way. (Example below.) What are my options to avoid code duplication in this case?

(I've read the post how to reduce the code of constructor overloading, where the top answer suggests using the keyword "this". In my case, I guess I would need to use "this" to call the first constructor from the second one after the input has been stored. This however results in a compilation error: "call to this must be first statement in constructor".)

Example code:

public class A {
  public A(String a) {
    //process a
  }
  public A() {
    String a = "defaultString";
    //process a
  }
}

EDIT: I'm taking a lot of fire for using an input dialog call in a class constructor (which I'm aware isn't exactly good practice). So I've changed the code example to direct the discussion away from this :).

share|improve this question
6  
Is there a reason that the line prompting the user for an input value couldn't be moved outside of the constructor, then all calls can use the same constructor? This has a pretty bad code smell when you prompt for user input inside of a constructor. – Mike Clark May 7 '12 at 21:50
    
Noted. This is just from a throwaway introductory exercise program, however, and I'm not being very rigorous. – andreasdr May 7 '12 at 21:54
up vote 8 down vote accepted

One way is to have an init method:

public class A {
  public A(String a) {
    init(a);
  }
  public A() {
    String a = "defaultString";
    init(a);
  }
  private void init(String a) {
    //process a
  }
}

PS: I agree with Mike Clark's comment – the line prompting the user for an input value couldn't be moved outside of the constructor.

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Say that I have one constructor that takes an input and another that asks for it via an input dialog.

Don't do that. It will make for horribly entangled and hard to maintain code in the long run. At least try to seperate UI concerns (input dialogs etc) from your object model (which you can feed a string in the constructor).

In my honest opinion you really don't want an overloaded constructor here.

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You may want to try chaining your constructors:

public class A {
  public A(String a) {
    //process a
  }
  public A() {
    this("defaultString");
  }
}

If you want to use a dialog to get the string, I recommend you present the dialog before calling this constructor.

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I think this is the preferred method:

public class A {
  public A(String a) {
    //process a
  }
  public A() {
    this(JOptionPane.showInputDialog("a"));
  }
}
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I'm not sure it is ever a good idea to call something like a JOptionPane from a constructor. This is just an idea but you really should take the buildA from a static method and perform it where you actually are intending on asking the user for input and then just call a single constructor.

public class A {
  public A(String a) {
    this.a = a;
  }
  public static A buildA(String input){
    if(input == null){
      input = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("a"); 
    }
    return new A(input);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you're right, the dialog should be moved out of the constructor. However, it's best to remove it from the object completely, including from any static methods – Clockwork-Muse May 7 '12 at 22:01
    
@X-Zero I completely agree. I am going to bold the part where I say this should be done outside of the class. – Krrose27 May 7 '12 at 22:02
    
#headdesk# - Sorry, somehow I missed that earlier. – Clockwork-Muse May 7 '12 at 22:14

Another option for reducing code duplication between constructors is to use an initialization block. Initialization block code will run before the constructor.

See

Using this method, you could put the common code into the initializer block, then leave the different logic in the specific constructor.

public class A {
  {
     //initializer block - common code here
  }
  public A(String a) {
    //constructor - specific code here
  }
  public A() {
    //constructor - specific code here
  }
}

This may not be ideal in all situations, but it is another way to approach the problem that I didn't see mentioned yet.

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