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I'm having trouble getting my ASP.Net page to return CSV on submit being clicked. Here's the asp button definition I have for the submit button in Form.aspx:

<asp:Button id="submitreport" name="submitbutton" text="submit" OnClick="Report_Submit" runat="server" />

And this is the corresponding function in Form.aspx.cs:

public void Report_Submit(object sender, EventArgs e) {
    Debug.WriteLine("GETS HERE?");
    Response.Charset = "UTF-8";
    Response.Cache.SetCacheability(HttpCacheability.NoCache);
    Response.Cache.SetAllowResponseInBrowserHistory(true);
    Response.ContentType = "text/csv";
    Response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", "attachment; filename='" + DateTime.Today.ToString() + ".csv'");
    Response.Write("test,output");
    Response.End();
}

When this is ran in Visual Studio I don't even see the debug print line. Does anybody know what's wrong with my setup?

Edit: I know for certain that the pages are set up right because if I put a breakpoint on my empty Page_Load function in Form.aspx.cs VS does break there. Besides that the breakpoint at the debug write line is skipped over on the form submit and the same page is returned again.

Update By creating a new project with just the button and the handler the Report_Submit() function is called and the CSV file is correctly generated. Since that narrows it down a little bit, does anybody know what could be going on in my other VS 2008 project that's causing this not to work?

share|improve this question
    
Have you compiled in debug mode, what happens if you set a breakpoint there? Btw, is your question really only related to the Debug.WriteLine? – Tim Schmelter May 7 '12 at 22:05
    
Where is the "content" (csv) being written into the response stream? – EdSF May 7 '12 at 22:11
    
The CSV content is being written to with Response.Write("test,output"); which I'm using to just test to see if an output file will be generated. – David May 7 '12 at 22:12
    
Debug mode never reached the writeline line after submit was entered. – David May 7 '12 at 22:13
    
Duh, getting old...anyway, I didn't see anything in your code that would stop it from working - and true enough I just copied everything and ran in debug mode without a hitch - Debug is sent to output window, browser is prompted to open or save the document. Just for good measure, format your DateTime string to not have spaces. – EdSF May 8 '12 at 3:46

First of all you should be using Fiddler to debug problems over HTTP, also why not use Response.TransmitFile()?

A couple of things to help:

  • Are you sure the Debug.WriteLine() is not executing?
  • Have you tried setting a breakpoint there?
  • Are you compiling in Debug mode?
  • Do you have more than once instance of IE open when debugging as this is has caught me out a few times before
share|improve this answer
    
I need the response but it looks like TransmitFile() can only take a string of a file's location as an argument. I just tried putting a breakpoint there and when submit was clicked the breakpoint was never reached. – David May 7 '12 at 22:08
    
Does VS say on the breakpoint that 'this breakpoint will not be hit?' – m.edmondson May 7 '12 at 22:12
    
How do you check is VS says that? I just ran the debugging with the breakpoint on the only instance of IE and clicked submit. When it never stopped at the breakpoint and just showed the same form again I had figured that the breakpoint was, not definitely, but most likely unreachable. – David May 7 '12 at 22:15
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found a pretty good work around that returns a .csv file (which also shouldn't be quoted in my header creating function calls, but that wasn't the problem). In addition, the shouldn't specify a name since ASP.NET fills that in, but that also wasn't the problem.

Moving just the relevant form processing code into its own project worked just fine, but my project was too large to manage that.

The workaround I found useful is to just move the button handling function into Page_Load() and use:

if(Request.HttpMethod == "GET") {
    Debug.WriteLine("this is just a request for the page"):
}
else if(Request.HttpMethod == "POST") {
    Debug.WriteLine("processing the form");
    //rest of code...
}
else {
    //some HTTP action that doesn't matter
}

to distinguish page requests (GET) from users entering the form (POST requests).

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