Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use fsockopen to communicate with a game server, which responds with some basic stats. It works perfectly when the server is online, but if the server is ever offline, the following code causes php to stop displaying the page that reads the data.

try {
        $socket = fsockopen($host, $port, $errno, $errstr, 10);
        if ($socket !== false) {
                fwrite($socket, "\xFE");
                $data = "";
                $data = fread($socket, 1024);
                fclose($socket);
                if ($data !== false && substr($data, 0, 1) == "\xFF") {
                       // get into
                } else {
                        // Server did not send back proper data, or reading from socket failed.
                        print "Server not available.";
                }
        } else {
             // ...
        }
} catch(Exception $e){
        // ...
}

I've tried the try/catch, I've tried adding a custom handler to the exception. My only idea is to run this outside of the web requests and store the response so that the web request isn't initiating it.

Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
Use CURL instead. It's far, far more reliable and you can set a timeout. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi May 7 '12 at 22:20
    
I haven't had to do much curl work for a while - besides just getting data so I'll have to do some work to convert this to curl. –  helion3 May 7 '12 at 22:33
    
Specifically, what kills the script? There shouldn't be a fatal error in that code. –  goat May 7 '12 at 23:26

2 Answers 2

First, I'd add a couple of echo commands, either side of the fsockopen call:

echo date("Y-m-d H:i:s")."Before open\n";
$socket = fsockopen($host, $port, $errno, $errstr, 10);
echo date("Y-m-d H:i:s")."After open (socket=".($socket===false?"Bad":"OK")."\n";

This is to confirm the 10 second timeout is working. If you never see the second message then the timeout is not working, and the problem is more obscure.

Anyway, if you are getting a valid $socket, but the lock-up happens later, then try:

if ($socket !== false) {
    stream_set_timeout($socket,2);  //2 second timeout
    stream_set_blocking($socket,false);  //no blocking
    fwrite($socket, "\xFE");
    ...

P.S. If adding those two commands solves the problem, then experiment to see if just one of them solves it. That would give a big clue what the real problem is.

share|improve this answer

It seems that by moving the logic outside the html generation worked. The lookup happens before any html is rendered, so if it fails it doesn't interrupt the html output.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.