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I have an equation ((1 -/+ p)/6) % p, which I need to run for a couple million values of p.

The code I currently have is

primes = [5,7,11,13,17,19,23,29,31,37,41,43,47,
          53,59,61,67,71,73,79,83,89,97]

if __name__ == "__main__":

    for p in primes:

        print ((1 - p)/6) % p, ((1 + p)/6) % p

which, as expected, gives me

4 1
6 1
9 2
11 2
14 3
16 3
19 4
24 5
26 5
31 6
34 7
36 7
39 8
44 9
49 10
51 10
56 11
59 12
61 12
66 13
69 14
74 15
81 16

What I'd like to know is how to get

1
6
2
11
3
16
4
5
26
31
7
36
8
9
10
51
56
12
61
66
14
15
81

I haven't really tried anything yet, I've tossed around the idea of using a generator. However, in doing so I'm not sure if I am going to run into performance issues.

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closed as not a real question by Johnsyweb, Mike Pennington, dawg, John, Sean Owen May 8 '12 at 7:29

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Do you want to print the first number twice? Then just put it twice! What does it have to do with generators? –  rodrigo May 7 '12 at 22:43
    
@rodrigo I'm going to run it a couple million times... factorials get expensive after a couple millions times, the factorial won't be there. It is only there now for illustrative purposes. I will remove it. –  John May 7 '12 at 22:53
    
How did you find those 'solutions'? –  Avaris May 7 '12 at 22:56
1  
We have no idea why you're choosing one answer or the other from each pair. –  Russell Borogove May 7 '12 at 22:57
2  
printing is more or less computationally expensive. You should avoid printing a couple of million values and just save the information you wish to derive from this program -- to be printed out later. –  Joel Cornett May 7 '12 at 23:08

1 Answer 1

Is this what you are looking for?

for p in primes:
    r1=f(p - 4) % p
    r2=((1 - p)/6) % p
    if r2==r1:
        print r1, r2
    else:
        print r1, ((1 + p)/6) % p   

When you say you haven't really tried anything yet, don't try and optimize it yet! Just get something that produces what you want -- THEN worry about using a generator or performance issues.

Edit:

You changed your question substantially, and it is not clear what you are looking for anymore. If you are looking for root finding, here is some code.

Scipy also has many root finding methods.

Pick a direction -- get something running -- THEN try and fix it if it is too slow.

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5  
You should get a 'telepathic' badge for this answer –  Mike Pennington May 7 '12 at 22:52

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