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I am not sure why a garbage value is being thrown in the if loop when i try to free dataToWrite. It works fine in else loop. Can anyone help me with this?

FILE *readFilePointer = NULL;
Message_buf outputMsgBuffer;
char fileData[PIPE_BUF];
char *dataToWrite=NULL;

readFilePointer = fopen(fileToReadFrom, "r");

if (readFilePointer == NULL)
{
    outputMsgBuffer.messageType=1;
    dataToWrite=(char *)malloc(strlen(strcat(fileToReadFrom," does not exists!!"))+1);
    memset(dataToWrite,0,strlen(dataToWrite));
    dataToWrite=strcat(fileToReadFrom," does not exists!!");
    strcat(outputMsgBuffer.messageText,dataToWrite);
    memset(dataToWrite,0,strlen(dataToWrite)+1);
    free(dataToWrite);
}
else
{   
    //outputMsgBuffer.messageText[0] = '\0';
    while (fgets(fileData, sizeof(fileData), readFilePointer) != NULL)
    {
        dataToWrite=(char *)malloc(sizeof(fileData));
        memset(dataToWrite,0,strlen(dataToWrite));
        strcpy(dataToWrite,fileData);
        strcat(outputMsgBuffer.messageText,dataToWrite);    
        free(dataToWrite);
    }

    fclose(readFilePointer);
}
outputMsgBuffer.messageType=1;
outputMsgBuffer.messageLength=strlen(outputMsgBuffer.messageText);
mesg_send(fd,&outputMsgBuffer);
}
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closed as too localized by Oli Charlesworth, Francis Upton, Corbin, Kerrek SB, Sean Owen May 8 '12 at 7:31

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Asking strangers to spot errors in your code by inspection is not productive. You should identify (or at least isolate) the problem by using a debugger or print statements, and then come back with a more specific question (once you've narrowed it down to a 10-line test-case). –  Oli Charlesworth May 7 '12 at 23:29
    
what symbol is garbage. How is it "thrown"? What is the "if loop"? –  Mooing Duck May 7 '12 at 23:30
    
I agree completely with Oli, however, I happened to notice that you're misusing strcat. –  Corbin May 7 '12 at 23:31
    
strlen on dataToWrite() is bad - you don't know what it's contents are - could lead to a UMR –  John3136 May 7 '12 at 23:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
dataToWrite=(char *)malloc(strlen(strcat(fileToReadFrom," does not exists!!"))+1);
memset(dataToWrite,0,strlen(dataToWrite));

You are not initialising the allocated memory, so calling strlen on dataToWrite invokes undefined behaviour.

Also, you seem to not be aware of the fact that strcat modifies the memory pointed to by its first argument, and returns a pointer to it,

dataToWrite=strcat(fileToReadFrom," does not exists!!");

throws away the just-allocated memory.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I didn't even see the strcat call, stopped reading at the bad strlen in the call to memset. –  Ed S. May 7 '12 at 23:34

Well, this jumps out at me:

dataToWrite=(char *)malloc(sizeof(fileData));
memset(dataToWrite,0,strlen(dataToWrite));

You're calling strlen on a char* that points to memory you just allocated with malloc. You have no idea what is going to be in that chunk of memory, yet you call strlen which looks for a null character before returning. Your memset is wrong and could be writing anywhere, leading to corrupt memory.

On a side note, don't cast the return value of malloc in C. It is completely unnecessary and can actually hide the fact (in older versions of the standard) that you forgot to include stdlib.h

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dataToWrite=(char *)malloc(strlen(strcat(fileToReadFrom," does not exists!!"))+1);

You've copied a string into fileToReadFrom; are you confident it is large enough to handle the extra string data in addition to the filename that it had? (And why does this have to happen here? Don't try to do too much in one line.)

I have a suspicion that you've misunderstood how strcat(3) works; take another look at the prototype:

   char *strcat(char *dest, const char *src);

The dest is the destination:

dataToWrite=(char *)malloc(strlen(strcat(fileToReadFrom," does not exists!!"))+1);
memset(dataToWrite,0,strlen(dataToWrite));
dataToWrite=strcat(fileToReadFrom," does not exists!!");

Assume fileToReadFrom contained hello. After this code, dataToWrite contains:

hello does not exists!! does not exists!!

If fileToReadFrom was not large enough, then you've scribbled over a lot of unrelated memory.

I strongly recommend finding every use of strcpy(3) in your program and audit each one for correctness. You may have exploitable security flaws in the rest of the program.

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There are many problems in your code.

dataToWrite=(char *)malloc(strlen(strcat(fileToReadFrom," does not exists!!"))+1);

are you sure fileToReadFrom has enough space?

dataToWrite=strcat(fileToReadFrom," does not exists!!");

again, are you sure? ... then you are overwriting your pointer to the new allocated memory

free(dataToWrite);

dataToWrite does not contain the pointer from malloc anymore.

strcat(outputMsgBuffer.messageText,dataToWrite);

you are sure outputMsgBuffer.messageText has enough space? if yes, why are you allocating memory for another pointer (in the else too)?

What you probably want is:

strcpy(outputMsgBuffer.messageText,fileToReadFrom); 
strcat(outputMsgBuffer.messageText," does not exists!!");

and in the else

strcpy(outputMsgBuffer.messageText,fileData); 

and nothing else (if you are sure outputMsgBuffer.messageText is big enough).

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