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i'm parsing a price from a json feed but i want to display an other button if the price is equal to 0

So i got something like

NSString *const Small = [NSString stringWithFormat:  @"%i", [PriceFree intValue]];

NOTE: PRICEFREE = 0 .

    if ([StoreParse objectForKey:@"price"]) {
    //display button to pay   

    } else if ([StoreParse objectForKey:@"price"] == Small) {

   //display button = free
    } else {
    }

But it's only displaying the 'pay' button and nog the free button if the price is 0

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1  
Hmmm ... to compare to numbers, use number1 == number2, it should return YES if they're equal? –  Whovian May 7 '12 at 23:50
    
NSString is not a number ... anyway. –  user166390 May 7 '12 at 23:54

3 Answers 3

Your error is comparing string references using ==, so you are comparing if the two variables refer to the same object and not whether they refer to strings which contain the same characters; to do the latter use the NSString method isEqualToString.

However you might be better off comparing the integer values, i.e.:

First change the definition of Small:

int Small = [PriceFree intValue];

and then change your comparison to:

[[StoreParse objectForKey:@"price"] intValue] == Small)

This has the advantage of comparing based on the numeric value the strings represent and not on the characters they contain, e.g. @"00" will compare equal to @"0" as both have the value 0.

Follow up after subsiduary question on the cost being $0.99 (99 cents)

If your price is in dollars and cents as a floating point number then you either:

(a) need to change int & intValue to float and floatValue above;

(b) convert the value to cents using, say, int Small = (int)([PriceFree floatValue] * 100); or

(c) use decimal numbers.

(a) has the disadvantage that you end up testing float values for equality, never a good idea; (b) avoids that and is easy; while (c) also avoids that but is a bit more involved. Real financial calculations don't use floating point to avoid rounding errors.

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+1 for both answering the question asked and suggesting the proper way to be doing this. –  Ken White May 8 '12 at 0:09
    
@Jones - if your price is in dollars and cents as a floating point number then you either: (a) need to change int & intValue to float and floatValue; (b) convert the value to cents as in (int)([PriceFree floatValue] * 100); or (c) use decimal numbers. (a) has the disadvantage that you end up testing float values for equality, never a good idea; (b) avoids that and is easy; while (c) also avoids that but is a bit more involved. Real financial calculations don't use floating point to avoid rounding errors. –  CRD May 8 '12 at 8:24
    
@CRD Post this as an answer so i can accept it! –  Jones May 10 '12 at 14:36

The comparison you are doing is for pointer values, not the actual strings, Try using:

} else if ([[StoreParse objectForKey:@"price"] isEqualToString:Small]) {

to compare the actual strings.

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Why not show how to compare actual integers instead, which is the right way to compare two integer numbers? –  Ken White May 7 '12 at 23:54
1  
@KenWhite Because the inputs are not integers? ;-) –  user166390 May 7 '12 at 23:55
    
@pst: At least one starts that way (PriceFree intValue). Why not convert the other to integer to match and then compare actual number values? What happens when the poster wants to convert to floating point values and the comparison of the string conversions no longer match? Better to teach the proper way instead of the wrong way, IMO. (Not downvoting this answer, but can't upvote either.) –  Ken White May 7 '12 at 23:58
    
@KenWhite I know what you're trying to say; you're correct, the comparison should be between numbers not strings. However. The questioner is pulling the string/number out of a collection. Which means that it will be an NSNumber - in which case the comparison would need to be isEqualToNumber to avoid the same problem. –  Abizern May 8 '12 at 0:04
    
@Abizern Hmm thanks it's not working is it because the normal price is $0,99 en if i do this check it reconize the 0 only? –  Jones May 8 '12 at 14:50

What you're doing is nicknamed string typing (a play on words on the term strong typing). String typing is when you convert every type to a string and use string methods to compare or manipulate data.

String objects are for text, and only text. If you want to compare numbers, make sure you are using numeric types.

I take it that StoreParse is a dictionary, containing a key price which maps to a NSNumber or NSDecimalNumber representing the price of the item. If price is also a string, then you need to rework your application so that StoreParse contains a numeric type for the price key.

If price is an NSNumber or NSDecimalNumber then you can work out whether something is free or not by:

if ([[StoreParse objectForKey:@"price"] intValue] == 0)
{
    // price is 0
}

Tip:

If you are dealing with currency, use NSDecimalNumber which is able to represent decimal numbers exactly. This is useful because most currency is in decimal. Binary floating-point types such as float and double aren't able to accurately represent all decimal numbers, and when dealing with currency it is important to maintain as much accuracy as possible.

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Thanks, but it's not working is it because the normal price is $0,99 en if i do this check it reconize the 0 only? –  Jones May 8 '12 at 16:32
    
@Jones: 0.99 isn't an integer so you will need to use either doubleValue instead of intValue, or you need to use the NSDecimalNumber class instead. –  dreamlax May 8 '12 at 18:51

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