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I have a wrapped list that looks like this:

[JsonObject(MemberSerialization.Fields)]
public class OrderManager : IEnumerable<Order>, ISerializable
{
    public OrderManager()
    { }

    private List<Order> orders = new List<Order>();

    public void AddOrder(OrderInfo orderInfo)
    {
        // do the work of making an order object from an OrderInfo.
        // Add the new order object to the private list of orders
        // orders.Add(order);
    }

    public IEnumerator<Order> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return orders.GetEnumerator();
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return orders.GetEnumerator();
    }

    public OrderManager(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {
        // do custom serialization work here (never gets hit)
    }

    public void GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {
        // do custom serialization work here (never gets hit)
    }
}

I include a field instance in a customer class like this:

[JsonObject(MemberSerialization.Fields)]
public class Customer
{
    public Customer()
    { }

    private OrderManager _orders
        = new OrderManager();
    public OrderManager Orders
    {
        get { return _orders; }
        set { _orders = value; }
    }
}

I can serialize a customer but the ISerializable interface on OrderManager is ignored. If I remove the JsonObject attribute from the OrderManager (probably what is preventing ISerializable from being used) the OrderManager is treated as an array and the ISerializable interface is still ignored.

I tried using ICollection instead of IEnumerable: JSON.NET cannot deserialize a wrapped collection

Since my wrapped collection is of type Order and my AddOrder method takes in OrderInfo, it doesn't really work to expose ICollection<Order>. Either way, the ISerializable interface was ignored.

Are there any workarounds?

Update

Just to clarify I do have IgnoreSerializableInterface set to false.

private JsonSerializer GetSerializer()
{
    var serializer = new JsonSerializer();

    serializer.TypeNameHandling = TypeNameHandling.Auto;
    serializer.TypeNameAssemblyFormat = System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.FormatterAssemblyStyle.Simple;

    var contractResolver = new DefaultContractResolver(true);
    contractResolver.IgnoreSerializableAttribute = false;
    contractResolver.IgnoreSerializableInterface = false;

    serializer.ContractResolver = contractResolver;

    serializer.PreserveReferencesHandling = PreserveReferencesHandling.All;
    serializer.ReferenceLoopHandling = ReferenceLoopHandling.Ignore;

    return serializer;          
}
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Have you tried moving the instantiation of _orders into the Customer constructor? –  scottm May 8 '12 at 0:34
    
Just tried that. With and without the JsonObject attribute on OrderManager, ISerializable was still ignored. –  mbursill May 8 '12 at 0:54
    
Just curious if you add the [Serializable] attribute and make the constructor for [JsonObject()] empty. I was reading up on this a bit on the JSON.NET doc site, and I'm wondering if there's a conflict that's happening. The Serializable attribute has the same effect as JsonObject(MemberSerialization.Fields), according to the docs. –  David Hoerster May 8 '12 at 22:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This answer might be late but:

This is because it checks for inheritance of IEnumerable before checking for inheritance of ISerializable so it will use the Enumerable interface to pull objects out first.

You can override this behavior by implementing your own contract resolver inheriting from DefaultContractResolver with this override:

    protected override JsonContract CreateContract(Type objectType)
    {
        if (typeof(ISerializable).IsAssignableFrom(objectType))
            return CreateISerializableContract(objectType);

        return base.CreateContract(objectType);
    }

Preferably with some better logic, but this at the root will cause objects that implement ISerializable and IEnumerable to use the ISerializable implementation first.

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