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I have 2 tables:

  • users (user_id, user_connected)
  • rooms (room_id, room_initiating_user_id, room_target_user_id)

I would like to delete all the "rooms" having both the initiating user and the target_user set to "user_connected=0"

I have two problems here:

1) How to target these users? Obviously this query won't work:

SELECT room_id
FROM rooms,users
WHERE
( 
(room_target_user_id=user_id) AND (user_connected=0)
)                   
AND
(                
(room_initiating_user_id=user_id) AND (user_connected=0)
)

2) I would like, with the same query if possible, to delete these rooms (no problem if I use a second query but it means that this query would be triggered for each result, which is a lot. Isn't it possible to delete these rooms at once?

Thank you for your help.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
delete from rooms
where room_initiating_user_id in (select user_id from users where user_connected = 0)
  and room_target_user_id in (select user_id from users where user_connected = 0)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Lajos Arpad for your answer. This seems a very elegant query indeed. –  Baylock May 8 '12 at 1:53
    
I was happy to help. Also, if you are sure your user_id is unique in the users table I have an even simpler solution. –  Lajos Arpad May 8 '12 at 1:54
    
I've edited my answer, to provide an alternative for the case when user_id is unique in the users table. –  Lajos Arpad May 8 '12 at 1:57
    
My id's are all unique (autoincrement), whatever the table of this app. I'm all eyes and ears for a simpler solution (to all the oher participants, please consider that I will study all your answers as there are also very interresting, thank you) –  Baylock May 8 '12 at 1:57
1  
@Lajos, are you sure the simpler solution works? To me it looks like you are only deleting rooms where initiating and target are the same user. –  bfavaretto May 8 '12 at 1:59

To target the users, you need to JOIN table users twice, once for the initiating user, and another one for the target user:

SELECT room.room_id
FROM rooms room
INNER JOIN users initiating
ON room.room_initiating_user_id = initiating.user_id
INNER JOIN users target
ON room.room_target_user_id = target.user_id
WHERE initiating.user_connected=0 AND target.user_connected=0

To delete those rooms, you can use the above as a subquery:

DELETE FROM rooms
WHERE room_id IN (
    SELECT room.room_id
    FROM rooms room
    INNER JOIN users initiating
    ON room.room_initiating_user_id = initiating.user_id
    INNER JOIN users target
    ON room.room_target_user_id = target.user_id
    WHERE initiating.user_connected=0 AND target.user_connected=0
)
share|improve this answer
    
The query looks to be correct, but it's overcomplicated and has a complexity of O(n^4), while this is solvable in a complexity of only O(n^2), see my answer. –  Lajos Arpad May 8 '12 at 1:36
    
You cannot delete from a table and select from the same table in a subquery. –  Ezequiel Muns May 8 '12 at 1:36
    
@Ezequiel Muns: Yes you can if you use table aliases. bfavaretto used the alias room for the rooms table. You can test it anytime by creating these tables, filling them with rows and run bfavaretto's query. It will work, but it will be too slow in my opinion. –  Lajos Arpad May 8 '12 at 1:45
    
@LajosArpad, that's interesting, I tend to favor joins instead of subqueries for performance reasons. Being a self-learner, and I never really understood the big-o notation, but I'll definitely look into this further! Thank you for your comment! –  bfavaretto May 8 '12 at 1:47
    
Thank you very much bfvaretto for your help. If you don't mind, I will go for the simplest query given by Lajos Arpad. –  Baylock May 8 '12 at 1:51

First, to select these rooms, you'll need to join to the users table twice:

SELECT r.room_id
FROM rooms r 
    JOIN users tgt ON r.room_target_user_id = tgt.user_id
    JOIN users ini ON r.room_initiating_user_id = ini.user_id
WHERE tgt.user_connected = 0 AND ini.user_connected = 0

Note: The use of two distinct aliases for the table users, so as to differentiate the two joins. Also, I' using JOIN syntax, rather than the older comma joins which are discouraged

To delete the rooms, you'll need a multi-table delete:

DELETE r
FROM rooms r 
    JOIN users tgt ON r.room_target_user_id = tgt.user_id
    JOIN users ini ON r.room_initiating_user_id = ini.user_id
WHERE tgt.user_connected = 0 AND ini.user_connected = 0
share|improve this answer
    
The complexity of this query is O(n^4), the problem can be solved with a complexity of only O(n^2), so this will be slow. Also, instead of DELETE r you can only write delete, because r is specified in the from clause. I'm not sure whether the syntax of DELETE r works. Did you test your code? –  Lajos Arpad May 8 '12 at 1:49
    
Thank you very much Ezequiel Muns for your help. If you don't mind, I will go for the simplest query given by Lajos Arpad. –  Baylock May 8 '12 at 1:52
    
@LajosArpad Does indeed. The DELETE r tells the query to only delete rows in rooms, not touching any of the joined rows in users. FYI: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/delete.html –  Ezequiel Muns May 8 '12 at 3:30
    
Yes, you are right here. –  Lajos Arpad May 8 '12 at 11:18

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