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I'm working on a Boggle game solver that would read lines of a text file (the board).

I've been going back and forth if I should use a vector of strings or a vector matrix of chars. I'm thinking the vector of chars would be easier to access as it would be myvec[y][x] where the vector of strings would require me to use the string.at() function.

I don't know which would have a better performance if I should parse each line in to the chars or leave the line as a string and access each char as needed. Any suggestions on which one I should do? Explaining why would be helpful.

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You can use [] with strings too. at provides out-of-bounds checking. –  chris May 8 '12 at 1:44
    
@chris Oh never tried that with strings. Ok well that pretty much solved my question since a vector of strings will be easier. Thanks. –  LF4 May 8 '12 at 1:46
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Strings are much better than char arrays. Always choose them if you can. Just so you know, the syntax is possible through the string class overloading operator[]. –  chris May 8 '12 at 1:48
    
@chris: While that is generally good advice, why would it be better for a Boggle game rather than a (essentially) a 2-d array of char where you're unlikely to be treating a row as a string? –  Johnsyweb May 8 '12 at 1:53
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@Johnsyweb, oops I missed the boggle part! Indeed a character array definitely works better for something like that. The question title is a bit misleading there. Strings should always be chosen if the sequence of characters has some meaning to it. –  chris May 8 '12 at 2:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As commented, you can use operator[] on strings just like vectors or arrays.

Under proper optimisation, the performace will be about the same for vector<char> as for string - both are arrays under the hood, and in both cases operator[] will effectively be a structure member access and an indirect lookup. They even provide almost the same set of methods.

Choose whichever makes your code more readable/simple.

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