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I am using openmp on a cluster. When I use MPI_INIT_THREAD with desired level of thread support as MPI_THREAD_MULTIPLE, the provided level is support is only 2. I do not know, whether I am doing some mistake or missing a compiler flag. On this cluster, mpi, openmp etc are available to be used.

On my ubuntu laptop with mpich2, I do get provided level of support as 3, with same code. However, I need to use the cluster for studies. My program is C++.

Can you please tell me, if I need to change something. Thanks. Let me know, if I need to provide more information.

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1  
what mpi do you have? –  Anycorn May 8 '12 at 2:02
    
I think it is openmp, which I run using aprun. On another cluster, it is definitely openmp, since I personally installed it. –  user984260 May 8 '12 at 2:04
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aprun? Is it cray machine? –  Anycorn May 8 '12 at 2:10
    
Yes. The one with aprun is cray. –  user984260 May 8 '12 at 2:11
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tell us more: XT? mpt version? –  Anycorn May 8 '12 at 2:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

On most current Cray machines, you can enable the desired MPI_THREAD_MULTIPLE by setting the environment variable

MPICH_MAX_THREAD_SAFETY=multiple

For Cray XT4, you had to load a module to enable it (it would replace the default MPI library); I don't have access on an XT4 anymore, so I don't remember the name of the module.

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Thank you, I am grateful for stumbling across this. Why is this so poorly documented? I haven't found this in any Cray documentation. Have an upvote. –  Rob Stewart Aug 24 '13 at 23:15
    
The relevant Cray documentation is normally in man pages. Doing a "man mpi" will give a lot of interesting information. –  ipapadop Aug 27 '13 at 21:59

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