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My work is in the process of switching from SVN to Git and we are re-evaluating how we use branches and tags.

We have seen the model which uses master as the always stable version where tags are used to identify releases and a separate development branches are used for unstable code (http://nvie.com/posts/a-successful-git-branching-model/).

We like this method of development, but it doesn't appear to allow for applying hotfixes to an already released version.

Our product is installed multiple clients servers and each may have a different version installed (for various reasons beyond our control). Today we manage our release using branches and master is used for development.

For example we might have 3 clients on different versions:

  • Client A - v1.1
  • Client B - v1.2
  • Client C - v1.3

If a critical bug is found in v1.2, we fix it in the v1.2, v1.3 and master branches and update clients B and C. We don't create a new branch for these changes, but technically they would be version v1.2.1 and v1.3.1.

We can't see how to switch to using only tags for releases when we need to be able to create a v1.2.1 when v1.3 is already out the door.

Can anyone recommend a model that would suit us better than creating a branch per release and doing development in master?

share|improve this question
    
If you need to hotfix a specific non-master release, just do it. It's a guide, not a set of rules set in stone. There is nothing stopping you from creating a branch called hotfix/whatever, based on a branch called release/whatever, which you then merge into release/whatever, develop and (potentially) master. It's up to you to figure out the best way to use Git for your company. – meagar May 8 '12 at 3:26
    
Also it's Git, not GIT. – meagar May 8 '12 at 3:27
    
@meagar I'm aware it's only guide and that's it's up to me figure it out. That's why I posted. I know there are others better informed on the subject and I wanted to pick their brain and get a broader view of the models I could adopt. – user1381057 May 8 '12 at 3:58
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can create a new branch based off an old tag. If you find a critical bug in v1.2 when you've moved on, just create a new branch from the v1.2 tag, fix the bug there, tag it as 1.2.1 and then cherry pick the fix into all other tags (now branches) that you're maintaining.

Even if you weren't doing your stable releases in master, this would still be applicable.

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You can use a stable master and still do branch-per-release (and that is in fact what I would recommend you do).

If you're going to need to patch in minor versions for earlier major releases, you will want to have a branch for each major release, and you shouldn't try to avoid that.

That doesn't stop you, however, from declaring master to be a stable branch and having people use separate branches for development, only merging those branches into master when they have determined them to be stable.

Keeping master stable has a number of benefits:

  • It means that anyone creating a new feature branch has a known-good base for their branch.
  • It makes it really easy to do a release - you just branch off master and make that your release.

You can also still use tags to mark the initial branch point for a given major release (and any minor version releases off of the major branches as well).

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We like this method of development, but it doesn't appear to allow for applying hotfixes to an already released version.

Did you see the branch named hotfixes? That branches from master when a hotfix is needed, with its changes going back into master, as well as into develop?

Today we manage our release using branches and master is used for development.

The nvie.com branching model does not use master for development, it uses develop. master should always be the most recent released version of the product.

If a critical bug is found in v1.2, we fix it in the v1.2, v1.3 and master branches and update clients B and C. We don't create a new branch for these changes, but technically they would be version v1.2.1 and v1.3.1.

Find out the earliest version on master that the bug occurs on; create a hotfix branch from that tag, and then backport the fix to develop. In fact, you should create a hotfix branch from every versioned tag in master the bug occurs in, and backport it to those as well, and then finally back into master at its head.

share|improve this answer
    
I did see the hotfix branch, but you'll note that it's a temporary development branch in the model. The changes in the hotfix branch and merged back into master before being tagged--so you can create 1.3.1 but not 1.2.1. I do see what you are suggesting, though. I just wanted to point out that the model described at nvie didn't cover what is needed. – user1381057 May 8 '12 at 4:02

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