Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm reviewing some code, and saw something I have never seen before. I did a find all references on an object used for locking, and got the following results.

I have replaced all of the file/class/member names to protect those who may need protecting.

C:\Sln1\ProjX\ClassX.cs - (17, 26) : public static object PublicStaticLockObj = new object();
C:\Sln1\Proj1\Class1.cs - (193, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj1\Class1.cs - (228, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj1\Class1.cs - (92, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj2\Class2.cs - (115, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj2\Class2.cs - (181, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj2\Class2.cs - (216, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj3\Class3.cs - (160, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj3\Class3.cs - (195, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj3\Class3.cs - (95, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj4\Class4.cs - (133, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj4\Class4.cs - (252, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj4\Class4.cs - (286, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj5\Class5.cs - (252, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj5\Class5.cs - (320, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj5\Class5.cs - (360, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj6\Class6.cs - (112, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj6\Class6.cs - (177, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj6\Class6.cs - (212, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj7\Class7.cs - (165, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj8\Class8.cs - (129, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj8\Class8.cs - (198, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj8\Class8.cs - (233, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj9\Class9.cs - (156, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj9\Class9.cs - (191, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
C:\Sln1\Proj9\Class9.cs - (90, 20) : lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)

Is there ever a condition where sharing a lock across modules is a good way to solve a problem? Is there any guidance on locking on public objects?

share|improve this question
    
It seems like you have a single all-powerful lock object for a lot of places in your code. It smells a bit fishy. Are all of these locks protecting a single data structure or are you using the locks for a bunch of unrelated structures? – Enigmativity May 8 '12 at 4:04
    
as others are saying, it's most likely a bad idea, but without context on what they're locking/serializing, it would be hard to recommend a specific pattern/approach for replacing it. – James Manning May 8 '12 at 4:14
    
If you're going to do that then you might as well do lock(typeof(ClassX))...not much difference really. – Brian Gideon May 8 '12 at 13:53
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If code smells, that reeks.

The main weakness of locks as a synchronization mechanism is that they are not composeable - needing to acquire multiple locks very easily causes deadlock.

The only way to prevent deadlocks is to limit the circumstances in which you will acquire a lock to only where it is absolutely necessary, and also limit the actions you will perform while the lock is held, e.g. avoid doing anything that can possibly take another lock, but also avoid doing anything that can block, sleep, or take a long time, since whatever operation takes so long has now effectively been promoted - it can block multiple threads at once!

Making locks public is a way to encourage developers to take locks they really don't need to take, or that they really haven't considered the consequences of taking.

You probably want a more official reference than me! Try the 'lock' statement documentation.

In general, avoid locking on a public type, or instances beyond your code's control. The common constructs lock (this), lock (typeof(MyType)), and lock ("myLock") violate this guideline:

lock (this) is a problem if the instance can be accessed publicly.

lock (typeof (MyType)) is a problem if MyType is publicly accessible.

lock(“myLock”) is a problem since any other code in the process using the same string, will share the same lock.

Best practice is to define a private object to lock on, or a private static object variable to protect data common to all instances.

Source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/c5kehkcz(v=vs.80).aspx

share|improve this answer

The PublicStaticLockObject may be intended to synchronize access to some PublicStaticResource, in which case, if everyone plays nicely with the object, you're not going to run into trouble. But if someone uses that lock object for a different resource, there's a risk of deadlock. Also note that the object is not readonly, so someone could replace it with a new object. That could cause trouble, too.

That is why ClassX should declare a private lock object and then expose the public static resource through public static methods; these methods will contain lock statements to protect the resource. For example, before:

public static class ClassX
{
    public static FileStream Stream { get; private set; }
    public static object PublicStaticLockObj = new object();
}

public class ClassY
{
    public void WriteToTheGlobalStream(byte b)
    {
        lock (ClassX.PublicStaticLockObj)
            ClassX.Stream.WriteByte(b);
    }
}

After:

public static class ClassX
{
    private static FileStream Stream { get; set; }
    private static object PublicStaticLockObj = new object();
    public static void WriteToTheStream(byte b)
    {
        lock (PublicStaticLockObj)
            Stream.WriteByte(b);
    }
}

public class ClassY
{
    public void WriteToTheGlobalStream(byte b)
    {
        ClassX.WriteToTheStream(b);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.