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I am referring to following query to find Nth highest salary of a employee.

select sal from emp t where &n = (select count(sal) from (select distinct sal 
 from emp) where t.sal<=sal);

One gentleman said this query works. Could someone please explain how equating a COUNT ( which really will be value between 1 to X where X is total distinct salaries) to &n produce this result ?

I am trying to understand how database handles this query internally and produces result ?

Thank you.

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Query should be like this. select sal from emp t where &n = (select count(sal) from (select distinct sal from emp where t.sal<=sal) AS x); –  mr_eclair May 8 '12 at 4:18
    
Definitely, the key here is understanding that it's a correlated query which can be confusing to newcomers to SQL. I liked the explanation given here as well since it's extremely thorough: Find nth highest salary - SQL –  Sammy Oct 10 '12 at 7:03

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

First, the query will return the nth lowest salary value. To return the nth highest salary value you must change t.sal <= sal to t.sal >= sal.

Next, this query works by first finding the distinct list of salary values as one derived table and then determines the number of employees that have a salary less than each one in this list. t.sal <= sal is taking the derived table (which most databases would require have an alias) and comparing each value against the outer emp table. It should be noted that this will return multiple rows in the case of a tie.

To manually trace the output, we need some inputs:

Alice       | 200
Bob         | 100
Charlie     | 200
Danielle    | 150

Select Distinct sal
From emp

Gives us

200
100
150

Now we analyze each row in the outer table

Alice - There are 3 distinct salary values less than or equal to 200
Bob - 1 rows <= 100
Charlie - 3 rows <= 200
Danielle - 2 row <= 150

Thus, for each salary value we get the following counts (and reordered by count):

Bob 1
Danielle 2
Charlie 3
Alice 3

The most important aspect that I think you are overlooking is that the outer emp table is correlated to the inner count calculation (which is why it is called a correlated subquery). I.e., for each row in the outer emp table, a new count is calculated for that row's salary via t.sal <= sal. Again, most database systems would require the inner most query to have an alias like so (note the As Z alias):

Select sal
From emp As t
Where &n =  (
            Select Count(Z.sal)
            From    (
                    Select Distinct sal
                    From emp
                    ) As Z
            Where t.sal <= Z.sal
            )
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2  
Thanks. However , its still not clear to me how following part will work ? where &n = (select count(sal) from.....) Wouldn't COUNT just return a number ? How it helps to select that particular row ? –  Vishal May 8 '12 at 4:26
1  
@Vishal - Look at how the very last results pan out. The count of distinct salary values <= 100 for Bob will be 1, Danielle: 2, Charlie: 3 and Alice: 3. Thus if you filter for say n = 2, you will get the nth lowest salary value. To get the nth highest salary value, you must change t.sal <= sal to t.sal >= sal –  Thomas May 8 '12 at 4:29
    
@Vishal - The inner query doing the Select Count is correlated to the outer query via t.sal <= sal. The t. part references the emp table in the outer most query. The sal part (without t.) references the inner query. Most RDMS would require that the derived table (starting with Select Distinct Sal) be aliased. (e.g. (Select Distinct From emp) As Z –  Thomas May 8 '12 at 4:33
    
@Vishal - Also remember that &n is your desired ranking (e.g., 1,2,3). Since the each row in the outer emp table is correlated to the count that is calculated (via t.sal <= sal ), for each employee we get their rank and determine if it matches the desired rank. –  Thomas May 8 '12 at 4:35
1  
@Serious - It depends on what you mean by "all" databases. Certainly, this solution should work on all database products going back 20 years. The only features required are Count(<field>), Distinct and subqueries. Ideally, you'd use ranking functions but support for ranking functions and Rank is not universal. MySQL for example does not support ranking functions. –  Thomas Sep 4 '12 at 16:03
select sal 
from (
  select sal, 
         dense_rank() over (order by sal desc) as rnk
) t
where rnk = 5;

Replace where rnk = 5 with whatever "nth" you want.

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To get the nth highest salary value just put the value of 'N'.

Select Min(Salary) From (Select Top N * From Table_Name Order by Salary Desc);
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SELECT TOP 1 salary
FROM (
SELECT DISTINCT TOP n salary
FROM employee
ORDER BY salary DESC) a
ORDER BY salary
where n > 1 (n is always
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  SELECT Max(Salary) as Salary
    FROM employee
    where  Salary Not in 
    (SELECT TOP N Salary FROM employee ORDER BY Salary DESC)
  where N is defined by you.

So let's say you have the following salaries in the table employee: Here employeeID and Salary are the columns of employee table.

EmployeeID Salary

 101  25,000
 154  89,000
 987  42,000
 450  12,000
 954  50,000

If we want to see the fourth-highest salary

Salary

25,000

Query return fourth highest salary.

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In the database record data entries like

employ_id    NAME     salary
101          Henry    24000
102          Smith    24000
105          Roy      17000  
106          Robbin   15000 
702          Mac      2500
708          Bill     2100
709          Kane     2000
710          Ted      2000

here Some of employees having same salary then how to calculate nth (highest/lowest)salary

for the calculation of 3rd highest salary

select * from emloyees where salary in (select salary from (select rownum rank , salary from (select distinct salary from employees order by salary **desc**)) where rank =3;

ans = 15000

similarly to calculate 3rd lowest salary Type same Query with a small change instead of desc type asc

select * from emloyees where salary in (select salary from (select rownum rank , salary from (select distinct salary from employees order by salary **asc**)) where rank =3;

Hope This will help you

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Change nth highest salary value just put the value of 'N'

SELECT e1.EmployeeName, e1.EmployeeSalary from Employee e1
where N = (
select COUNT(e2.EmployeeSalary) from Employee e2 where e2.EmployeeSalary >= e1.EmployeeSalary)
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There are so many ways to achieve this:-

1)

 Select Top(1) sal from emp 
    where sal not in (select DISTINCT top(n-1) sal from emp order by sal desc)

2)

select salary     
          from (
           select salary,
           roe_number() over (order by salary ) as row from emp
          ) emp1
  where row= n;
  • This query will not work if multiple rows has same value one after another.

3)

select salary     
              from (
               select salary,
               dense_rank() over (order by salary ) as row from emp
              ) emp1
      where row= n;
  • It will create unique row number for all unique salary amount.

4)

 Select Min(sal) From 
       (Select DISTINCT Top n * From emp Order by sal Desc)as emp1;

5)

   SELECT * FROM emp Emp1
            WHERE (n-1) = (
                             SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT(Emp2.Sal))
                             FROM emp Emp2
                             WHERE Emp2.Sal > Emp1.Sal)
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