Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It needs a lot of work to make the webpages render correctly in IE6.

Other browsers (like FF, Safari) are fine because they usually follow the W3C standard better. Even IE7 is better than IE6 (although its acid 3 test score is only 14/100).

I would like to know how many people still care about IE6 when developing webpages. If you still work hard to deal with IE6, what is the right time you think you can get rid of it?

share|improve this question
4  
Depends a lot on your expected userbase. –  DevinB Jun 26 '09 at 14:15
2  
The only demographic that you shouldn't worry about is the Amish. For everyone else: make it work. –  mgroves Jun 26 '09 at 15:16
    
A more pressing question is why MS didn't follow W3C in the first place? Or is that idealism? –  StuperUser Jun 26 '09 at 15:32
add comment

16 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

I have to :( Some customers are still using IE6 as a company-policy, and the pages must look good for them.

We have a tool that allows the user to create pages using a Web editor, and you have no idea how much of workaround code we must write to support that old browser :/

share|improve this answer
    
100% Agreement. As long as you want to be profitable, you need to develop for whatever your clients are using. IE6 has very little existence among developers, but a massive user-base among everybody else unfortunately. –  Jonathan Sampson Jun 26 '09 at 14:17
    
I still have IE6 installed due to Intranet sites requiring it! –  Phil Hannent Jun 26 '09 at 14:17
5  
I would support even Mosaic if a customer pay for it. –  Jonathan Jun 26 '09 at 14:31
    
Where I work, our approved "nation wide" PC build requires IE version 6 installed (though we can also have Firefox, latest version, so go figure). I suspect they want to force us to make sure we support the worst browser in common use. –  Roboprog Jun 26 '09 at 14:39
add comment

Two questions:
1. Are your customers using IE6?
2. Are they PAYING customers?

share|improve this answer
6  
This is essentially Andrea's response. I would encourage you to upvote her response rather than providing practically the same answer. –  Jonathan Sampson Jun 26 '09 at 14:34
add comment

I guess it depends on your audience. If you website is a general public site, then you should strive to support IE6 as best you can.

One of our websites, which gets monthly uniques in the millions range shows the following browser stats:

Browser

Visits

% visits
Internet Explorer
    x,xxx,xxx 	67.56%
Firefox
    3xx,xxx 	21.10%
Safari
    xxx,xxx 	8.67%
Chrome
    xx,xxx 	1.65%
Mozilla
    x,xxx 	0.37%

Out of which Internet Explorer accounts for:

     Browser Version  	 
    Visits 	
Browser Version contribution to total:
1.  
7.0
    xxx,xxx 	60.19% 	
2.  
6.0
    3xx,xxx 	26.00% 	
3.  
8.0
    1xx,xxx 	13.78%

So, for this specific website, IE6 still beats Firefox by a slim margin IE6 is very close to Firefox in regards to total number of visitors, so it needs to be supported.

I would be curious to see StackOverflow's browser stats. I believe that if your visitors are more technical, you'll likely see much smaller numbers of IE6 visitors (or any IE version for that matter).

share|improve this answer
4  
26% of 68% beats 21%? –  Nosredna Jun 26 '09 at 14:40
    
Well, these numbers are more recent and they have shifted a bit, so indeed, IE6 has 17% overall, and Firefox has 21%. IE6 used to beat Firefox on this website a month ago, but there has been a visitor surge since then. Numbers are still very close. –  legenden Jun 26 '09 at 14:45
    
(+1) For "Strive to support". It is not always easy, but if possible, you should do it. –  DevinB Jun 26 '09 at 15:24
add comment

After reading a blog post by Peter-Paul Koch I am seriously considering making IE6 compatibility a premium option on my development services. It is interesting to see the stats showing how most IE6 use is during office hours.

share|improve this answer
1  
An interesting note that I've found. Websites (of ours) that don't support IE6 have fewer IE6 users. Some people have indicated that this means we shouldn't bother supporting it. I believe, on the other hand, that it means we are simply LOSING the IE6 users, rather than that there aren't any to begin with. –  DevinB Jun 26 '09 at 15:19
add comment

I generally stop supporting a version of a browser once it is two versions old. However, you should think about the audience you're writing web pages for. A lot of governments are typically slow to make changes to their browser versions, so they might need IE6. A customer can override any decision you make about browser compatibility as well.

share|improve this answer
    
This is essentially Andrea's response. I would encourage you to upvote her response rather than providing practically the same answer. –  Jonathan Sampson Jun 26 '09 at 14:29
3  
Jonathan...relax....this answer was only 2 minutes after Andrea's...perhaps they were still writing it...seeing the same comment from you so many times on the page is a drag...let the community vote the answers down or not at all...kthx –  Webjedi Jun 26 '09 at 14:51
2  
Posting the same comment over and over is spam. –  Nosredna Jun 26 '09 at 14:53
add comment

It all depends on your target audience.

For example, if your web site contains information for linux developers, you can more or less forget about IE6, not worth developing for it. However, if you are developing a e-shop of gardening goods, chances are the visitors will just use whatever browser their PC (and those PCs might be outdated) has installed, and making sure it all works on IE6 would be a good idea.

There is another thing to consider - if the (paying) customer says he wants it to work on IE6, it must work on IE6.

share|improve this answer
add comment

My company's policy is to support the current and previous major version of IE. Therefore, this is now IE 7 and 8, so we don't have to support IE6 any more.

Unfortunately, now we need to support IE 8, which is still not very impressive.

share|improve this answer
1  
I've heard that IE7 users are upgrading to IE8 faster than IE6 users are, which has kind of an interesting effect of hollowing out the middle of the IE6, IE7, IE8 line. –  Nosredna Jun 26 '09 at 14:55
add comment

We have to because our client uses IE6 internally. Since they pay us millions of dollars per year, we pretty much have to do what they say. We can't force them to upgrade. We certainly wish we could since we spend tons of time making our pages work on IE6 as well as IE7, IE8, Firefox 2, Firefox 3, Chrome, Safari 2 & Safari 3. 18% of the visitors to our website use IE6.

share|improve this answer
    
Can I encourage you to up-vote Andrea's answer, since you both provided the same response, but she was much earlier. –  Jonathan Sampson Jun 26 '09 at 14:21
    
Also, if your client is paying you millions of dollars per year, then yeah, I'd expect you to conform your application to their specifications, instead of having them upgrade to suit you. –  DevinB Jun 26 '09 at 15:29
5  
@Jonathn I was typing when her answer came in. I'm sorry I don't type as fast as she does. Doesn't make my response any less useful. –  Jeffrey Hines Jun 26 '09 at 16:28
add comment

As a safety net (no pun intended) I would, just because a lot of the people that I work with still use IE6 or maybe even earlier. As a place with a lot older machines (and older folks) there are still using IE6 religiously (I work at a college campus). The last thing we want to hear here is that something doesn't work on their website and isn't compatible, etc.

share|improve this answer
add comment

For my personal project I focus on FF/Opera/Safari/IE8. I just check that pages stay usable in IE7. As for IE6, I haven't seen it for ages and don't know where to test with it even if I wanted to.

Software that I develop at work was originally targeted at IE. Result: it was able to work in FF after some third-party components were updated, but it is totally screwed in Opera/Safari.

Develop first for the good browsers, then see if you can fix for the bad ones.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I do, though it pains me. I develop web applications for my hospital and every workstation still uses IE6. Many of our vendors have yet to move to support IE7 (or anything else).

share|improve this answer
    
This is essentially Andrea's response. I would encourage you to upvote her response rather than providing practically the same answer. –  Jonathan Sampson Jun 26 '09 at 14:28
add comment

It certainly requires some consideration when developing, IE6 should at the very least be able to display the content in a usable form.

It's all about your users though, if IE6 counts for a large majority then sure you should make it look good, but there is little point in wasting time hacking css if they only count for 1% or so.

share|improve this answer
    
This is essentially Andrea's response. I would encourage you to upvote her response rather than providing practically the same answer. –  Jonathan Sampson Jun 26 '09 at 14:28
add comment

I haven't cared about IE6 in a long, long time. But as long as the IE6 browser percentage of visiting users to our sites (millions of hits per day) remains in the double digits, the site has to work in IE6.

If you are finding it too much work to support IE6, you could always show a message indicating they need to upgrade. Not recommended for a site that already supports IE6. But for a time Facebook did not support IE6 after their November 08 upgrade. They displayed a message to upgrade.

share|improve this answer
add comment

No. My compagny have stop using HTML as presentation layer for web application. We use flex, or occasionally silverlight.

EDIT : I see several time the "and if the custumer want to pay for it". It's not working like that for us. We selling software, our software run in Flash/silverlight runtime. So if the buyer want it's software to run, he have to install the runtime.

It's the same thing with java. For running a java app, you have to install the JVM.

share|improve this answer
add comment

As well as the good answers regarding target audience and business factors there's another question that perhaps needs answering - what do you actually mean by support?

Does support mean that the website will look the same in IE6 as it does in modern browsers? Or does it mean that there may be consistencies within the design and layout of the website but the functionality remains identical? Perhaps not supporting the website means blocking anyone from viewing the website that is using IE6?

There is an excellent post on this by Jeremy Keith called the the IE6 Equation where he states:

Each end of that scale is extreme. I don’t think that anybody should be actively blocking any browser but neither do I think that users of an outdated browser should get exactly the same experience as users of a more modern browser. The real meanings of "supporting" or "not supporting" IE6 lie somewhere in-between those extremes.

A lot of developers/designers are following the Yahoo graded Browser Support which is well worth a read. The Yahoo Graded Browser support defines ie6 as requiring A-grade support. This covers topic such as progressive enhancement and graceful degradation which may be of interest.

So yes I personally do support IE6 so that I never turn anyone away from accessing my content but at what level - it depends.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Absolutely not. IE7 has been around long enough for IT departments to make the upgrade. Anyone not upgrading at this point is just lazy, or fears Microsoft way too much.

IE6 is absolute garbage compared to the latest browsers such as Chrome, Safari and even IE8.

I would recommend that devs detect IE6 and then tell people to upgrade, as this antiquated browser is no longer supported.

share|improve this answer
    
Even if your customers would pay you to do so? –  Matthew Jones Jun 26 '09 at 14:34
1  
Firstly the question doesn't say a difference for paying or none paying, simply stating would you support it. So the comment is a little irrelevant as an extra variable in the question. Down voting this is poor as the answer IS valid, you might just not like it! +1 –  Shadi Almosri Jun 26 '09 at 14:51
2  
First of all, I did not downvote it, I simply asked for a clarification. Second, paying customers largely drive our work, and so I was asking if that made a difference. Please do not assume that I downvoted JackM because I wrote a comment asking him a hypothetical question. –  Matthew Jones Jun 26 '09 at 14:55
2  
(-1) For a few reasons. "Absolutely not": If you are designing an internal website and your users use IE6 and you say "Absolutely Not" then you are absolutely not doing your job. Then you claims that the companies which haven't upgraded are lazy, or fearing microsoft. Neither of which are NECESSARILY true (although possible). IE6 is complete garbage compared to browsers which came out YEARS later, this is true, but if it wasn't hard to support, then the OP wouldn't ask whether to support it. And lastly and most importantly, you are suggesting that your website tell the users what to do. ... –  DevinB Jun 26 '09 at 15:14
    
When you design a website, it is your job to provide information or a service to users. It is your job to make their lives easier in some way. In your solution, you are telling the USERS to make YOUR life easier, so that you don't have to go through the heinously painful (and it is heinously painful) process of supporting IE6. –  DevinB Jun 26 '09 at 15:16
show 3 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.