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UNION and UNION ALL queries can outperform equivalent queries using OR-connected predicates under certain circumstances. To my knowledge, this is partially because UNION subselects can be executed in parallel and they can thus have their own "sub-plan" specific to each part of the OR-connected predicate, which is probably far more optimal due to simpler applicable query transformations.

But writing OR-connected predicates is usually much more readable and concise, even if subquery factoring were applied to a UNION ALL solution. My question is: Is there a way to indicate to Oracle, that a single, costly OR-connected predicate should be transformed into a UNION ALL operation? If there is such a hint/method, under what circumstances can it be applied (e.g. do any constraints need to be present on the columns involved in the predicates, etc)? An example:

CREATE TABLE a AS
  SELECT 1 x, 2 y FROM DUAL UNION ALL
  SELECT 2 x, 1 y FROM DUAL;

-- This query...
SELECT * FROM a
WHERE x = 1 OR y = 1

-- Is sometimes outperformed by this one, for more complex table sources...
-- Note: in my case, I can safely apply UNION ALL. I know the two predicates to
-- be mutually exclusive.
SELECT * FROM a
WHERE x = 1
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM a
WHERE y = 1

Note, I'm aware of the /*+ USE_CONCAT */ hint:

SELECT /*+ USE_CONCAT */ * FROM a
WHERE x = 1 OR y = 1

But it doesn't seem to produce what I need (no forced UNION ALL operation in the execution plan):

-------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation         | Name | E-Rows |
-------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT  |      |        |
|*  1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL| A    |      2 |
-------------------------------------------

Maybe, there is some restriction to this hint? I have Oracle 11g2 available for this.

share|improve this question
    
How many rows (in % of all rows) will the condition x = 1 or y = 1 return (in the real table)? What about using the PARALLEL hint in the "or" query? – a_horse_with_no_name May 8 '12 at 7:48
    
@a_horse_with_no_name: Actually, the (real) condition is of the form (flag_function() = 1 and condition1) or (flag_function() = 0 and condition2). The two sub-conditions mutually exclude each other depending on a PL/SQL flag_function(). I've noticed that Oracle creates a much better plan for this when using UNION ALL rather than when using OR. PARALLEL will probably not help much, as the amount of data is not so big in this case, but the plan is complex... Besides, this query is run very frequently in user sessions. I wouldn't want to hog too many resources with PARALLEL hints – Lukas Eder May 8 '12 at 7:55
1  
Those queries are not equivalent. You should use UNION instead of UNION ALL. You will get different results when you have rows where both x and y equal 1. – GriffeyDog May 8 '12 at 18:42
    
@GriffeyDog: Yes yes. I know the data and tailored the query in a way that they are equivalent (with prior knowledge). I'll update the question – Lukas Eder May 9 '12 at 7:46
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe this may have something to do with indexes existing on the columns you use in the OR predicate.

I tested using the following in 11gR2.

create table scott.test as 
select level l, 
       decode(mod(level,2), 1, 1, 2) x, 
       decode(mod(level,2), 1, 2, 1) y, 
       dbms_random.value(1, 3) z from dual 
connect by level < 1000;
/

begin
   dbms_stats.gather_table_stats('scott', 'test');
end;
/

I then explained the following queries in TOAD, (EXPLAIN PLAN FOR)

select x, y, z from scott.test
    where (floor(z) = 1 and x = 1) or (floor(z) = 2 and y = 1)
    ;

SELECT STATEMENT Optimizer Mode=ALL_ROWS        10          4                                
  TABLE ACCESS FULL COS_DM.TEST 10      280     4   

select /*+ USE_CONCAT */ x, y, z from scott.test
where (floor(z) = 1 and x = 1) or (floor(z) = 2 and y = 1)
;

SELECT STATEMENT Optimizer Mode=ALL_ROWS        10          4                                
  TABLE ACCESS FULL COS_DM.TEST 10      280     4                                


select x, y, z from test where (floor(z) = 1 and x = 1)
union all
select x, y, z from test where (floor(z) = 2 and y = 1)
;

SELECT STATEMENT Optimizer Mode=ALL_ROWS        10          8                                
  UNION-ALL                                              
    TABLE ACCESS FULL   COS_DM.TEST 5   140     4                                
    TABLE ACCESS FULL   COS_DM.TEST 5   140     4                                

So it appears the hint's not working. I then added an index to the x & y columns:

create index test_x on test (x, y);

begin
   dbms_stats.gather_table_stats('scott', 'test');
end;
/

Rerunning the queries now:

select x, y, z from scott.test
    where (floor(z) = 1 and x = 1) or (floor(z) = 2 and y = 1)
    ;

SELECT STATEMENT Optimizer Mode=ALL_ROWS        10          4                                
  TABLE ACCESS FULL COS_DM.TEST 10      280     4   

select /*+ USE_CONCAT */ x, y, z from scott.test
where (floor(z) = 1 and x = 1) or (floor(z) = 2 and y = 1)
;

SELECT STATEMENT Optimizer Mode=ALL_ROWS        10          8                                
  CONCATENATION                                              
    TABLE ACCESS FULL   COS_DM.TEST 5   140     4                                
    TABLE ACCESS FULL   COS_DM.TEST 5   140     4                                

select x, y, z from test where (floor(z) = 1 and x = 1)
union all
select x, y, z from test where (floor(z) = 2 and y = 1)
;

SELECT STATEMENT Optimizer Mode=ALL_ROWS        10          8                                
  UNION-ALL                                              
    TABLE ACCESS FULL   COS_DM.TEST 5   140     4                                
    TABLE ACCESS FULL   COS_DM.TEST 5   140     4                                

It appears that after adding the index (even though it's not being used) the optimizer decided to use the hint after all!

Perhaps you could try this?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for this analysis! Indeed there are no indexes on (the real columns represented by) x and y. I'll try adding an index on x. y, however, can't be indexed easily in the real query, as it originates from a LEFT OUTER JOIN... – Lukas Eder May 8 '12 at 14:48
    
The optimizer is finicky about these things. You may find it might also try to do a bitmap conversion to rowids with a bitmap OR if you index each column independently. – N West May 8 '12 at 14:49
    
OK, I see, I'll try to follow up on those things. After some investigation, it turns out that the CONCATENATION really is applied on the real query (I made a mistake). But you still answered my simplified question, which seems to be overly simplified... :) – Lukas Eder May 8 '12 at 15:05

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