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I have a rather trivial question but it's something that I haven't been able to find in other questions here or on online tutorials: How might we be able to format the output of a Python program that so that it fits a certain aesthetic format without any extra modules?

The aim here is that I have a block of plain text like that from a newspaper article, and I've filtered through it earlier to extract just the words I want but now I'd like to print it out in the format that each line only has 70 characters along it and any word won't be broken if it should normally fall on a line break.

Using .ljust(70) as in stdout.write(article.ljust(70)) doesn't seem to do anything to it.

The other thing about not having words broken would be as:

Latest news tragic m

urder innocent victi

ms family quiet neig

hbourhood

Looking more like this:

Latest news tragic

murder innocent

victims family 

quiet neighbourhood

Thank you all kindly in advance!

share|improve this question
    
I think this is duplicate of this: stackoverflow.com/questions/250357/smart-truncate-in-python –  jgritty May 8 '12 at 8:26
1  
Also, for newspaper's and typesetting, see this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerning –  jgritty May 8 '12 at 8:28
    
Never mind, textwrap seems like a good fit. –  jgritty May 8 '12 at 8:39
1  
is this homework? –  moooeeeep May 8 '12 at 9:19
    
@mooeeeep No, I'm just looking to learn something new do I've picked up a copy Python for dummies and I'm going through it in my spare time. Just looking to fill some gaps in what I've read is all. –  user1359892 May 8 '12 at 23:41

3 Answers 3

Checkout the python textwrap module (a standard module)

>>> import textwrap
>>> t="""Latest news tragic murder innocent victims family quiet neighbourhood"""
>>> print "\n".join(textwrap.wrap(t, width=20))
Latest news tragic
murder innocent
victims family quiet
neighbourhood
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer! It worked a treat but I'm wondering if it's also possible to do something similar without the textwrap module? I expect it may take a lot more effort though wouldn't it? –  user1359892 May 8 '12 at 8:52
    
Why would you not use textwrap? –  Marcin May 8 '12 at 9:19
    
If you want to write your own code for this specific case I think that's fine too. It shouldn't be difficult at all. It will use only standard python functions. –  Abhranil Das May 8 '12 at 9:29
    
@user1359892: Have a look at the Lib/textwrap.py. It is written in Python. You can study how it works. –  pepr May 8 '12 at 11:20
    
Thanks pepr and Abhranil I'll have to look into both and see if I can figure out how the module works =) –  user1359892 May 8 '12 at 23:42

use textwrap module:

http://docs.python.org/library/textwrap.html

share|improve this answer

I'm sure this can be improved on. Without any libraries:

def wrap_text(text, wrap_column=80):
    sentence = ''
    for word in text.split(' '):
        if len(sentence + word) <= 70:
            sentence += ' ' + word
        else:
            print sentence
            sentence = word
    print sentence

EDIT: From the comment if you want to use Regular expressions to just pick out words use this:

import re

def wrap_text(text, wrap_column=80):
    sentence = ''
    for word in re.findall(r'\w+', text):
        if len(sentence + word) <= 70:
            sentence += ' ' + word
        else:
            print sentence
            sentence = word
    print sentence
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Satyajit! I'll have to give this a go. It looks just like what I was imagining. And instead of the word.split() do you think it'd be ok to use a regex to maybe refine where and how I split it? –  user1359892 May 8 '12 at 23:43
    
Yes definitely. If you want just the words and not the punctuations (this answer)[stackoverflow.com/a/1059596/504262] would help. Use re.findall(r'\w+',text). –  Satyajit May 9 '12 at 4:51
    
If you find this answer right could you please accept it. –  Satyajit May 9 '12 at 4:56

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