Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this WPF slider:

<Slider Height="22" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Width="100" TickPlacement="BottomRight" AutoToolTipPlacement="BottomRight" TickFrequency="1" Minimum="10" Maximum="110" Value="{Binding Path=Zoom, Mode=TwoWay}" Ticks="100"/>

and my c# code behind

public object Zoom
{
    get { return _zoom.ToString() }
    set
    {
        try
        {
            string zoom = value.ToString().Replace(",", ".");
            if (zoom.EndsWith(" %"))
            {
                _zoom= System.Convert.ToInt32(System.Convert.ToInt64(zoom));
            }
            OnPropertyChanged("CurrentZoom");
        }
        catch (FormatException ex)
        {
            //TODO: =)
        }
    }
}

how is it possible that only integers can be stored in _zoom? I don't need a decimal number.

for example:

zoom is "13,99999"

_zoom should be 13 (int)

_zoom= System.Convert.ToInt32(System.Convert.ToInt64(zoom));

so i get this error:

Value was either too large or too small for an Int32.

whats wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Maybe it's a problem with culture. Depending on the setting of your computer, Convert might expect a decimal point or a decimal comma. –  svick May 8 '12 at 8:45
    
why do you convert zoom to an int64, then convert that to an int32? :S why not straight into an int32? –  RhysW May 8 '12 at 9:45

2 Answers 2

This will return the Decimal value to the LEFT of the dot/decimal.

Calculates the integral part of a specified decimal number.

 Math.Truncate(zoom)

More Info

share|improve this answer
    
_zoom = System.Convert.ToInt32(Math.Truncate(System.Convert.ToDecimal(zoom))); say also Value was either too large or too small for an Int32. –  David May 8 '12 at 8:44
    
try : _zoom = Math.Truncate(zoom); –  Zaki May 8 '12 at 9:00
up vote 0 down vote accepted
_zoom = (int)Math.Round(System.Convert.ToDouble(zoom));
share|improve this answer
    
have a look at the Math.Round method. It has an overload for the Midpoint-Rounding. Default is ToEven (eg. if you have 2.5 it will round down to 2.0. but if you have 3.5 it will round up to 4.0). With Away from zero it will always round up to the next number link –  Nicholas May 14 '12 at 10:40
    
@Nicholas it's very useful. Thanks –  David May 14 '12 at 10:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.