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I'm looking for an elegant way to implement a moving average filter in c#. Now, that would be easy, but at the borders, the averaging window shall wrap around the start/end. This kind of made my code ugly and unintuitive, and I was wondering whether there was a smarter way to solve this using LINQ or so.

So what I currently have is:

// input is a List<double> y, output is List<double> yfiltered
int yLength = y.Count;
for (int i = 0; i < yLength; i++)
{
    double sum = 0.0;
    for (int k = i - halfWindowWidth; k <= i + halfWindowWidth; k++)
    {
        if (k < 0)
        {
            // k is negative, wrap around
            sum += y[yLength - 1 + k];
        }
        else if (k >= yLength)
        {
            // k exceeds y length, wrap around
            sum += y[k - yLength];
        }
        else
        {
            // k within y.Count
            sum += y[k];
        }
    }
    yfiltered[i] = sum / (2 * halfWindowWidth + 1);
}
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3  
The mod (%) operator should help with calculating indices that wrap (k % yLength), which would remove your if statement. –  George Duckett May 8 '12 at 8:53
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Expanding on my comment, you could use the mod (%) operator to get k to wrap
from 0 to ylength - 1

    // input is a List<double> y, output is List<double> yfiltered
    int yLength = y.Count;
    for (int i = 0; i < yLength; i++)
    {
        double sum = 0.0;
        for (int k = i - halfWindowWidth; k <= i + halfWindowWidth; k++)
        {
            sum += y[(k + yLength) % yLength];
        }
        yfiltered[i] = sum / (2 * halfWindowWidth + 1);
    }
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1  
k % yLength produces negative index when k is negative. Should do (k + yLength) % yLength. Also, you inner loop can be reduced to a LINQ, see my answer. –  Yorye Nathan May 8 '12 at 9:06
    
@YoryeNathan: Good catch, silly me. –  George Duckett May 8 '12 at 9:07
    
that's the key, thanks! - ah, right, fixed already. ;) –  Efrain May 8 '12 at 9:29
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Here is a completely other suggestion -

I was trying to actually make it better, rather than more readable.

The problem with your current code is that it sums up many numbers again and again, when not really needed.

Comparing both approaches after the implementation code...

I'm only summing a bunch for the first time, and then subtracting the tail and adding the head, again and again:

double sum = 0;

// sum = Enumerable.Range(i - halfWindowWidth, halfWindowWidth * 2 + 1)
//    .Select(k => y[(k + yLength) % yLength]).Sum();

for (var i = -halfWindowWidth; i <= halfWindowWidth; i++)
{
    sum += y[(i + yLength) % yLength];
}

yFiltered[0] = sum / (2 * halfWindowWidth + 1);

for (var i = 1; i < yLength; i++)
{
    sum = sum -
          y[(i - halfWindowWidth - 1 + yLength) % yLength] +
          y[(i + halfWindowWidth) % yLength];

    yFiltered[i] = sum / (2 * halfWindowWidth + 1);
}

And here are the speed tests, comparing the full-recalculation approach vs. this one:

private static double[] Foo1(IList<double> y, int halfWindowWidth)
{
    var yfiltered = new double[y.Count];

    var yLength = y.Count;

    for (var i = 0; i < yLength; i++)
    {
        var sum = 0.0;

        for (var k = i - halfWindowWidth; k <= i + halfWindowWidth; k++)
        {
            sum += y[(k + yLength) % yLength];
        }

        yfiltered[i] = sum / (2 * halfWindowWidth + 1);
    }

    return yfiltered;
}

private static double[] Foo2(IList<double> y, int halfWindowWidth)
{
    var yFiltered = new double[y.Count];
    var windowSize = 2 * halfWindowWidth + 1;

    double sum = 0;

    for (var i = -halfWindowWidth; i <= halfWindowWidth; i++)
    {
        sum += y[(i + y.Count) % y.Count];
    }

    yFiltered[0] = sum / windowSize;

    for (var i = 1; i < y.Count; i++)
    {
        sum = sum -
              y[(i - halfWindowWidth - 1 + y.Count) % y.Count] +
              y[(i + halfWindowWidth) % y.Count];

        yFiltered[i] = sum / windowSize;
    }

    return yFiltered;
}

private static TimeSpan TestFunc(Func<IList<double>, int, double[]> func, IList<double> y, int halfWindowWidth, int iteration
{
    var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

    for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
    {
        var yFiltered = func(y, halfWindowWidth);
    }

    sw.Stop();
    return sw.Elapsed;
}

private static void RunTests()
{
    var y = new List<double>();
    var rand = new Random();

    for (var i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
    {
        y.Add(rand.Next());
    }

    var foo1Res = Foo1(y, 100);
    var foo2Res = Foo2(y, 100);

    Debug.WriteLine("Results are equal: " + foo1Res.SequenceEqual(foo2Res));

    Debug.WriteLine("Foo1: " + TestFunc(Foo1, y, 100, 1000));
    Debug.WriteLine("Foo2: " + TestFunc(Foo2, y, 100, 1000));
}

Time complexities:

MyWay: O(n + m)

OtherWay: O(n * m)

Since Foo1 is O(n * m) and Foo2 is O(n + m) it's really not surprising that the difference is huge.

Results on this not really crazy big scale are:

Results are equal: True

Foo1: 5.52 seconds

Foo2: 61.1 milliseconds

And on a bigger scale (replaced 1000 with 10000 on both iterations and count):

Foo1: Stopped after 10 minutes...

Foo2: 6.9 seconds

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hehe, as I was writing my test case, I came to this insight, too. a smart way to do it, but performance isn't really an issue for me. so i'm rather going for good readability and maintainability. thanks again for your interest! –  Efrain May 8 '12 at 9:37
    
@Efrain Note that because the time complexity of my way is really better than the one of the other, you might want to consider going for this way with documentation after all, if you want your user to wait 61ms instead of 5.5 seconds, or 7 seconds instead of more than 10 minutes... It's something to consider! How big is your list likely to be, and what would be halfWindowWidth? Will you call the method many times? –  Yorye Nathan May 8 '12 at 10:11
    
it's n=32, and m=7 .. so as i said, negligible. - oh wow, you have time at hands it seems. ;) –  Efrain May 9 '12 at 9:17
    
@Efrain How many times is the method likely to run? –  Yorye Nathan May 9 '12 at 11:56
    
i'm using this to calculate statistical values from which a report is generated. it is only executed once per data set - and the loading of those data, report generation and the other calculations take wayyyy more effort. also, the process is not automated, i.e. the user has to pick a data file to analyze and then wait 3s. again, yep, i get your point, just in this case i prefer readability over performance. –  Efrain May 10 '12 at 12:03
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for (var i = 0; i < yLength; i++)
{
    var sum = Enumerable.Range(i - halfWindowWidth, halfWindowWidth * 2 + 1)
        .Select(k => y[(yLength + k) % yLength]).Sum();

    yFiltered[i] = sum / (2 * halfWindowWidth + 1);
}

Or even:

var output = input.Select((val, i) =>
                 Enumerable.Range(i - halfWindowWidth, halfWindowWidth * 2 + 1)
                           .Select(k => input[(input.Count + k) % input.Count])
                 .Sum()).ToList();
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Can't that be replaced with nested LINQ calls? –  abatishchev May 8 '12 at 9:09
    
@abatishchev It can. See my edit. –  Yorye Nathan May 8 '12 at 9:12
    
thanks for the LINQ solution! Well, it's compact, but I find it quite hard to read.. but maybe that's because I'm just not that used to LINQ yet. I guess I will go for the for-loop solution in George's answer for now. –  Efrain May 8 '12 at 9:33
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